Could an Electric car Re-charge its battery, while in motion, using Solar Panels on the roof.?

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Could an Electric car Re-charge its battery, while in motion, using Solar Panels on the roof.?

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Elza Hellister

Charging an electric car is an important process for its smooth operation, so I advise you to use more reliable and efficient methods of recharging it. You can find portable charger for electric car hereĀ https://www.besen-group.com/portable-ev-charger/ and charge it anywhere

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Yes, but Photovoltaic cells are notoriously inefficient. Some recent advances have pushed efficiencies into the 40% range but they are still experimental. Typical efficiency will range between 15 and 25% for modern cells, maybe slightly higher if you buy VERY expensive ones. However, the surface area required to generate any real amount of electricity is huge compared to a car. At best you could expect maybe a few hundred watts on an average car in direct sunlight covered with solar cells on the roof, hood, and trunk. Consider 1 horsepower is 746 watts. A midsize car may use 30-50 horsepower to maintain highway speeds, so you are talking around 22,000 to 37,000 watts to keep a car moving. Even if you could generate 400 watts from the panels, it would only amount to 1 to 1.8% of your cars energy requirements on the highway. This is actually being looked at by Toyota for use on the next generation Prius, however it is being planned to use it to power the air conditioner, but will likely

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Well it could, not only that several experimental solar panel only cars have been built, the problem is that the little solar cells are not sophisticated and advanced enough yet to produce enough energy to propel a family sized vehicle. In a recent PBS documentary it was stated that Exxon spends less than a 10th of 0.1% of it’s total profit in alternative fuel research, they did not only not deny it, they defended it. My guess is that they probably have a hand in government via lobbyists and other means to curtail the development of cleaner and more fuel efficient cars. But they are not the only ones… GM wants $10 billion from the government to “help” merge with Chrysler -who is about to go broke-, meanwhile GM adamantly refuses to build and/or import more fuel efficient cars in the US, while in Europe Vauxhall in the UK and Opel in Germany (both GM subsidiaries) have been building decent, safe cars with up to 65 mpg fuel efficiency, Ford too by the way. Meanwhile small companies in