How are the initial divorce documents (Summons and Complaint or Summons With notice) served upon my spouse?

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Posted Glen Moore edited answer

How are the initial divorce documents (Summons and Complaint or Summons With notice) served upon my spouse?

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Glen Moore Glen Moore edited answer

It depends on your country. Because in every country there is different legislation. For example if Georgia it is a little bit different than in US. I found onĀ https://stearns-law.com/divorce/divorce-process-in-georgia/ that Same-sex divorce in Georgia has its complexities. Very often questions and concerns regarding same-sex divorce, including concerns over whether the state of Georgia will acknowledge same-sex divorces. Questions related to key issues in a divorce such as asset distribution or custody are just some of the things that can make same-sex divorce more complicated in Georgia. So, every country has it’s own rules that have to be respected.

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Some procedures may be performed differently in different countries and in different countries. You can take advice from your local divorce lawyer. It will give you a full answer what documents and in what order will be transferred to the second party and what documents you will need to prepare

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Under New York Law, the defendant in a divorce action must be personally served with the initial divorce papers. This means that a process server must physically provide the documents to your spouse. They cannot be left at their residence, they cannot be mailed and they cannot be given to someone else on behalf of your spouse. Question: My former spouse and I signed a stipulation of settlement a few years ago requiring me to pay her maintenance (alimony). I am struggling financially at the present time and want to go back to court to have my maintenance payments lowered or terminated altogether. Can I do this? Answer: You can seek to have your maintenance payments lowered or terminated, however it is extremely difficult to modify a maintenance obligation contained in an agreement of the parties. The Court imposes a standard which requires you to demonstrate that your continued payment of maintenance would cause you extreme financial hardship.

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