How are the tests done?

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How are the tests done?

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One or more of the following tests may be done. Skin prick test: A skin prick test is often used to test for food allergies. For this test, different types of food extract are put on tiny areas of scratched skin. A drop of food extract is put on the skin and then the skin is pricked with a small needle through the drop of the food extract. The test can also be done with a pricking device that has been presoaked in the food extract. Only the top layer of skin is pricked. The test is usually done on the back or the arm. The skin test is ready to check in about 15 minutes. If you are allergic to the food in any of the extracts, a red bump that looks like a mosquito bite will appear at the spot where the food extract was placed. Blood test (RAST test): Blood tests are not done as often as skin prick tests, but they can be useful in certain cases. A sample of your blood is sent to a lab for testing. The test measures the amount of IgE antibody in the blood. The body makes this type of antib

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If a 24-hour urine collection is ordered, please go to the lab to get a container for the urine collection and carefully follow the instructions on the other side of this page. If blood tests are ordered, you must have nothing to eat or drink (except water) after midnight, and be at the lab about 8:00 AM. If a “fasting second-void morning urine” specimen for NTX is ordered, you must have nothing to eat or drink (except water) after midnight, and be at the lab about 8:00 AM. Urinate at home before you go to the lab, and plan on giving the lab a fresh urine specimen when you are there. If all three types of tests are ordered, you may combine them in one of the following ways: When you give your 24-hour urine container to the lab at 8:00 AM, you can also have a fasting blood specimen drawn and give them a fresh urine specimen, or Go to the lab for a fasting blood test and second void urine specimen first, and they will then give you a container for doing the 24-hour urine collection later

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Y-DNA tests can only be performed on a male individual. Females can choose a male relative with the same (unmarried) surname for this test. In the case of the simplest paternal line Y-12 test, what you get back are the numerical results at 12 Y-DNA marker locations. The numbers indicate the times that a particular sequence of bases repeats at each of the marker locations. The marker locations and nomenclature (“Aleles”) have been standardized among different labs so that results can be compared worldwide. These repeats are referred to as “Short Tandem Repeats” or “STRs”. In general, these marker locations have been found to mutate frequently (in terms of tens of thousands of years) so they serve to differentiate genetic lines and to establish migratory routes. You can then visit one of the searchable Y-DNA databases, to see if any other individuals match your particular number of repeats for each Alele. Usually you will find a few that do match. If they do not share your surname, howev

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Most of the tests use a blood specimen taken before the baby leaves the hospital. The baby’s heel is pricked to obtain a few drops of blood for laboratory analysis. The same blood sample can be used to screen for a number of disorders. Usually, the baby’s blood sample is sent to a state public health laboratory for testing. The health care provider responsible for the infant’s care receives the results. Hearing loss tests measure how a baby responds to sounds. The tests use either a tiny, soft earphone or microphone that is placed in the baby’s ear. If these tests show abnormal results, the baby may need more extensive testing to see if he or she has hearing loss. What Should I Do if My Baby Is Diagnosed With One of the Conditions? Your baby may need treatment at a specialized pediatric center. It is essential for your child’s healthy development to follow the recommendations of his or her doctor. For More Information Find out which tests are routinely done in your state by asking your

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Most of the tests use a blood specimen taken before the baby leaves the hospital. The baby’s heel is pricked to obtain a few drops of blood for laboratory analysis. The same blood sample can be used to screen for a number of disorders. Usually, the baby’s blood sample is sent to a state public health laboratory for testing. The health care provider responsible for the infant’s care receives the results. Hearing loss tests measure how a baby responds to sounds. The tests use either a tiny, soft earphone or microphone that is placed in the baby’s ear. If these tests show abnormal results, the baby may need more extensive testing to see if he or she has hearing loss. What Should I Do if My Baby Is Diagnosed With One of the Conditions? Your baby may need treatment at a specialized pediatric center. It is essential for your child’s healthy development to follow the recommendations of his or her doctor. March 2009. This article is an update from a previous article that is on kidsgrowth.com.

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