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How did Plato die?

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He supposedly died in his sleep at the age of 80 after attending the wedding feast of one of his students. So he died peacefully in his sleep. Read the attached article. Found another article corroborating the fact that Plato died in his sleep. Here is the excerpt from it (full article available by clicking on the second link): The following passage about Plato's final day in 347 B.C. is the conclusion to Eric Voegelin's Plato: "Plato died at the age of eighty-one. On the evening of his death he had a Thracian girl play the flute to him. The girl could not find the beat of the nomos. With a movement of his finger, Plato indicated to her the Measure." What is to be noted about this riveting passage? First of all, we observe that Plato died in his own bed. He was some eleven years older than Socrates at the latter's death. Plato did not drink hemlock by order of the laws of the democracy. To be sure, he did die in the evening, like Socrates. Athens could have let Socrates die of old ... more
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By differing accounts, Plato was in his 80s when he died. Not much is known about his later life simply because it was too boring for any other philosopher to document. It is assumed he simply died of old age (heart attack, stroke, etc.). Even if he had choked on his food, it probably would have been noted. Also keep in mind that if you had means, and you had to be rich to attend any Academy, a wedding feast would have lasted for at least days if not a week or more. more
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Plato's death is not so dramatic as that of his teacher Socrates, who was condemned to death for Sophistry and who chose to die (by drinking hemlock) rather than give credence to his accusers by escaping, which he was free to do. more
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The assembly of Athens became mad at Plato for hie philosophies,. and during the wedding feast, soldiers and the guard elite of Athens surrounded him and brought him to a small room, where they forced him to drink hemlock, a very deadly poison, he did not resist, and began laughing, and chugged all the hemlock down, and said a very famous phrase wich i do not remember. and he died. many paintings depict people mourning his death, and the moment he drank the hemlock, you might be able to find this on google. more
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The first of Plato's remaining two Sicilian adventures came after Dionysius I died and his young son, Dionysius II, ascended to the throne. His uncle/brother-in-law Dion persuaded the young tyrant to invite Plato to come to help him become a philosopher-ruler of the sort described in the Republic. Although the philosopher (now in his sixties) was not entirely persuaded of this possibility ( Seventh Letter 328b-c), he agreed to go. This trip, like the last one, however, did not go well at all. Within months, the younger Dionysius had Dion sent into exile for sedition ( Seventh Letter 329c, Third Letter 316c-d), and Plato became effectively under house arrest as the "personal guest" of the dictator ( Seventh Letter 329c-330b). Plato eventually managed to gain the tyrant's permission to return to Athens ( Seventh Letter 338a), and he and Dion were reunited at the Academy (Plut. Dion 17). Dionysius agreed that "after the war" ( Seventh Letter 338a; perhaps the Lucanian War in 365 B.C.E.), ... more
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