How do I keep a Beagle puppy from chewing up objects when Im at work?

0
Posted

How do I keep a Beagle puppy from chewing up objects when Im at work?

0

A beagle is NOT the dog to have in a one dog home or if no one is around all day! They were bred to hunt and to hunt in packs. We have a part beagle, part Australian shepherd. Lovely dog, also a year old. He runs out in the pasture with the other two dogs until they are all panting and then he still has energy to play! I would strongly suggest, in your situation, to find your pup a good home with room to run and children to play with (they are excellent with kids), and, if you want an animal which can tolerate being alone and the only animal, probably a cat would be a better choice. If you refuse to give up your beagle, then what you need to do is take that dog out for long walks and runs both before and after work. Do NOT feed puppy chow as that is too high in protein. And give her plenty of chew toys — the kind you can hide doggy treats in would be a good choice to keep her busy for a long time. But please consider giving her a better home. You may be the nicest, most loving person

0
tracy mclaren

My best advice would be to get the puppy a chew toy whether it’s something you buy or something old in the house they you don’t mind if the puppy chews it up. You can also get him/her a rawhide bone which can be chewed up. You will also need to start teaching him/her that it’s naught to chew up your stuff.

0
Susan Biffath

Crate training is a fantastic way of keeping your mischievous  puppy from getting into trouble when your not around plus it satisfies their instinct to den and also can give them a sense of security .

0
Lacy Sheridan

Your dog is most likely chewing for one or a combination of three reasons: boredom, teething, and not knowing any better. As nobody is home, your dog has nobody to socialize and play with, and chewing is a natural boredom fighter in dogs. They also may be teething if they’re still very young, so check their gums for blood or teeth poking through. A trick that helps with dogs I know that are teething is freezing bagels and giving them to the dog to chew on. It gives them a nice treat and helps with the pain. Since beagles aren’t very big, you might want to try half a bagel or another smaller treat. To combat the training issue, your dog should not be left loose home alone. Until you are sure your dog won’t be destructive when unsupervised, they should always be crated when you’re not home to watch them. This will not only prevent them from destroying your stuff, but keep them from doing it in a way that reinforces the behavior to them (as it does when you’re not home). If a dog chews something up and nobody stops them, even if it’s only because nobody is home, they learn that it’s fun and okay. I would absolutely advise to invest in a good crate to keep your puppy in when you’re not able to watch them. The best sized crate for training is big enough that the full-grown dog can stand up without bumping their head on the top and comfortably turn in a full circle, so you may want to go a size up from what will fit your dog now so they’ll fit as an adult. When you can’t watch your puppy, keep them outside or in their crate. If they try to chew on something they shouldn’t, take it away from them (do not tug or wave it around, this will only make them think it’s a game), tell them “no”, and quickly replace it with something they can chew on, like a toy or bone. This teaches them to go to their things when they want to chew, and also reinforces “no” in their mind as a cue to stop what they’re doing and find something else to do.

As far as crate training your puppy, which you will need to do if you get a crate, it’s a very valuable thing for a dog to learn, because there are tons of instances where your dog may be confined to a crate for travel or in an emergency and need to be comfortable for your sake and theirs. Put in their bed or blanket so they’re comfortable and have something familiar, a shirt or towel or something that you don’t mind getting dirty that smells like you (don’t wash it beforehand, so it smells really good) so that the dog has the comfort of your scent in there with them, and plenty of things for them to do. Add a favorite toy, a bone or Kong, and a couple extra toys just so they have something to keep them busy. If possible add a water bowl. Your dog will bark and howl the first several times they’re left in the crate, and as difficult as it sounds you should not respond to them, not even to tell them “no”. Dogs will take negative attention (“no”, yelling, etc.) over no attention at all, and if they’re ignored they will learn to settle down. The good news is your dog is just a puppy still, so they’ll learn fairly quickly. When you have the time to work with them, play games with the crate like tossing treats inside for your puppy to run and get, or shutting them in for a few seconds at a time and then letting them out for tons of praise and treats. They’ll learn to love their crate. Most dogs’ problem with crates is purely because of the lack of attention, but they are built to have a small, cozy place that’s all theirs and once they get used to being crated most dogs love having their little “den”. Many will even choose to sleep in it over anywhere else in the house once they’re trained. 

0
Jessie Jones

First off, congratulations on choosing a beagle. 

They are among the most loyal of dogs and one of the smartest breeds alought it doesn’t seem like it when they are young, the main reasons they are frowned open as an indoor pet is that they are incredibly stubborn as puppies, very hard headed this usually settles at around 3 years old, until around then they are pretty much toddlers stuck in the terrible twos stage. 

This makes it hard but not impossible, ignore all the comments about how they aren’t suited or shouldn’t be inside also I would like to point out that all dogs are hunting animals or were that’s the point of domestication so ignore that comment beagles are dogs not wolves. Also about the pack animals comment all dogs are like that because they are all companionship creatures, they like to be social but it doesn’t have to be with other dogs that’s why many dogs will bond with children or specific  humans or other creatures, my beagle when I am home runs around the house with a kitten and a guinea pig and has never harmed either although when I’m not home it’s just the kitten unless I lock her in the bathroom as the guinea pigs not toilet trained. ( good luck with training your beagle to go where she should, they make a habit of getting close or almost where you want them to) but like humans there will be specific individual humans or animals that individual dogs do not get along with.

I have a proudly stubborn two year old beagle who does just fine indoors but I have had the same trouble with her. I also found that they are a semi lazy breed, I use a walk in the morning whenever possible, it doesn’t have to be far no more than about half way around the block and while I was having the trouble with her I found furniture training was a huge help I just continued to place her on the furniture I wanted her on ( we got a small toddlers couch for her and kept putting her on the floor when she was on any of the others) moving her bed / couch in-line with a window that sunlight reaches and she can see out the window. In doing just these things and collecting a cardboard box full of toys as well as leaving the tv on, I found she would just sleep and nap or watch people / traffic and the tv until I came home. 

Try toys with different pitches in the squeaker. Try this with cheap toys and expect her to pull a few apart. You will find she will quickly choose a favourite. Tell her off when you get home if she does pull any apart a firm no ought to do it. Collect the busted toys and put them up where she can see them but cannot reach them ( when she goes to bed either repair them or throw them away, you just want her to be able to see what your upset at) when you are home it will help. I found that just with the walk and the toys and turned on tv where she can see it she just sleeps or watches the pictures on the tv till I get home. But I do try hard not to leave things where she can get them.

In doing this please remember they are exactly like toddlers so there will be times she will throw a tantrum and destroy things to get your attention. Or cause damage without meaning to. She will never turn or endanger you, so this is no reason to fear the tantrums, she won’t damage anything on purpose because she’s angry it’ll just be doing something naughty to get your reaction then throw herself on the floor and lay there pouting at you for a while. (a unique trait among beagle breeds is that they can pull human facial movements, they can smile like angels, smirk like they know something you don’t or when they have done something you haven’t found out about yet and put their bottom lips out in a pout when they don’t get their own way so brace yourself as no one does a better puppy eyes look then a beagle.)

Beagles are also food addicts they will never say no to food and so it can be extremely easy for them to get over weight also there will be a lot of foods that will end up giving your puppy the runs, to the point you believe she’s extremely ill.

if she’s in the kitchen while you cook you tell her out and keep scooting her back to the door way, this will teach her she isn’t allowed near the food unless you give it directly to her. Eventually she will not pass the door way. This is good training but also helps if your little one has a problem with getting into the rubbish. If it’s at all possible don’t close the kitchen door just keep shooing her out. She will eventually get that you are trusting her and eventually will not want to break that trust she will eventually just wait in the doorway. I hope this helps as I’m not exactly sure what trouble yours is getting into. Beagles are notorious for training while young but the reward is one amazingly loyal and lovable animal and one where you can see that your love is returned.