How do I keep a Beagle puppy from chewing up objects when Im at work?

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How do I keep a Beagle puppy from chewing up objects when Im at work?

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Rajat Singh

you can give him the calcium bones for chewing which are available in the market. I also do the same for my dog

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Something that I have found useful when training my own puppies not to chew was putting tobasco sauce on items that they tend to chew. However, if it is an item that will be ruined by tobasco sauce, then you can also look at purchasing one of the many different chew deterring sprays on the market. My family has used Bitter Yuck! and it has proven to work very well with our chocolate lab puppy! We also will put peanut butter in a Kong toy, and freeze it overnight. We give the toy to our puppy right before we leave in the morning. It keeps her entertained for hours!

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Jessie Jones

First off, congratulations on choosing a beagle. 

They are among the most loyal of dogs and one of the smartest breeds alought it doesn’t seem like it when they are young, the main reasons they are frowned open as an indoor pet is that they are incredibly stubborn as puppies, very hard headed this usually settles at around 3 years old, until around then they are pretty much toddlers stuck in the terrible twos stage. 

This makes it hard but not impossible, ignore all the comments about how they aren’t suited or shouldn’t be inside also I would like to point out that all dogs are hunting animals or were that’s the point of domestication so ignore that comment beagles are dogs not wolves. Also about the pack animals comment all dogs are like that because they are all companionship creatures, they like to be social but it doesn’t have to be with other dogs that’s why many dogs will bond with children or specific  humans or other creatures, my beagle when I am home runs around the house with a kitten and a guinea pig and has never harmed either although when I’m not home it’s just the kitten unless I lock her in the bathroom as the guinea pigs not toilet trained. ( good luck with training your beagle to go where she should, they make a habit of getting close or almost where you want them to) but like humans there will be specific individual humans or animals that individual dogs do not get along with.

I have a proudly stubborn two year old beagle who does just fine indoors but I have had the same trouble with her. I also found that they are a semi lazy breed, I use a walk in the morning whenever possible, it doesn’t have to be far no more than about half way around the block and while I was having the trouble with her I found furniture training was a huge help I just continued to place her on the furniture I wanted her on ( we got a small toddlers couch for her and kept putting her on the floor when she was on any of the others) moving her bed / couch in-line with a window that sunlight reaches and she can see out the window. In doing just these things and collecting a cardboard box full of toys as well as leaving the tv on, I found she would just sleep and nap or watch people / traffic and the tv until I came home. 

Try toys with different pitches in the squeaker. Try this with cheap toys and expect her to pull a few apart. You will find she will quickly choose a favourite. Tell her off when you get home if she does pull any apart a firm no ought to do it. Collect the busted toys and put them up where she can see them but cannot reach them ( when she goes to bed either repair them or throw them away, you just want her to be able to see what your upset at) when you are home it will help. I found that just with the walk and the toys and turned on tv where she can see it she just sleeps or watches the pictures on the tv till I get home. But I do try hard not to leave things where she can get them.

In doing this please remember they are exactly like toddlers so there will be times she will throw a tantrum and destroy things to get your attention. Or cause damage without meaning to. She will never turn or endanger you, so this is no reason to fear the tantrums, she won’t damage anything on purpose because she’s angry it’ll just be doing something naughty to get your reaction then throw herself on the floor and lay there pouting at you for a while. (a unique trait among beagle breeds is that they can pull human facial movements, they can smile like angels, smirk like they know something you don’t or when they have done something you haven’t found out about yet and put their bottom lips out in a pout when they don’t get their own way so brace yourself as no one does a better puppy eyes look then a beagle.)

Beagles are also food addicts they will never say no to food and so it can be extremely easy for them to get over weight also there will be a lot of foods that will end up giving your puppy the runs, to the point you believe she’s extremely ill.

if she’s in the kitchen while you cook you tell her out and keep scooting her back to the door way, this will teach her she isn’t allowed near the food unless you give it directly to her. Eventually she will not pass the door way. This is good training but also helps if your little one has a problem with getting into the rubbish. If it’s at all possible don’t close the kitchen door just keep shooing her out. She will eventually get that you are trusting her and eventually will not want to break that trust she will eventually just wait in the doorway. I hope this helps as I’m not exactly sure what trouble yours is getting into. Beagles are notorious for training while young but the reward is one amazingly loyal and lovable animal and one where you can see that your love is returned.

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Alisha Suver

Crate training give your pup the security it craves though please know they won’t take to it right away. Soothing music being left on when u leave can give your pet the feeling that you are near and leave maybe leave something with your scent beside his crate when u leave as well. In addition to all this try a puppy kong, put the filling in it freeze it the night before so it takes a while for your pup to get to it all. Hope this helps

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Audrey Hughes

I would suggest buying a chew toy. However, try your best to avoid rawhide bones. Contrary to popular belief they are not good for your dog. This is a great article explaining why you should avoid them.

The Most Dangerous Pet Chew Ever: Rawhide!

I would also recommend crate training the puppy. That way he/she has a safe space to stay while you are at work or out of the house. You will also have piece of mind knowing that you will come home to everything intact the way you left it.

http://www.humanesociety.org/animals/dogs/tips/crate_training.html?credit=ad_gg_search_pettips_011216&gclid=CjwKEAjwjPXIBRDhwICRg-DbgHISJADP6QXpqI600nQj5lW7dn6Q-kJCWjCehvSXo527zIOnFlR98hoCzCHw_wcB?referrer=https://www.google.com/

This is a great article on the do’s and don’ts of crate training.

Good Luck