How does smoking affect pregnant women and their babies?

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How does smoking affect pregnant women and their babies?

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Pregnant women who smoke risk the health and lives of their unborn babies. Smoking during pregnancy is linked with a greater chance of miscarriage, premature delivery, stillbirth, infant death, low birth-weight, and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Up to 5% of infant deaths could be prevented if pregnant women did not smoke. When a pregnant woman smokes, she’s smoking for 2. The nicotine, carbon monoxide, and other harmful chemicals enter her bloodstream, pass directly into the baby’s body, and keep it from getting vital nutrients and oxygen it needs for growth. Breast-feeding is a good way to feed a new baby, but if the mother smokes it exposes the baby to nicotine and other poisons in the smoke through breast milk. Nicotine can cause many unwanted symptoms in the baby, such as restlessness, a rapid heartbeat, vomiting, shorter sleep times, or diarrhea. Some research has also suggested that children whose mothers smoked while pregnant or who have been exposed to secondhand smoke,

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Pregnant women who smoke risk the health and lives of their unborn babies. Smoking during pregnancy is linked with a greater chance of miscarriage, premature delivery, stillbirth, infant death, low birth weight, and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Up to 10% of infant deaths would be prevented if pregnant women did not smoke. When a pregnant woman smokes, she’s smoking for two. The nicotine, carbon monoxide, and other harmful chemicals enter her bloodstream, pass directly into the baby’s body, and prevent the baby from getting essential nutrients and oxygen for growth. Breast-feeding is a good way to feed a new baby, but smoking may cause problems. If the mother smokes, the baby is exposed to the nicotine and other smoke poisons from her breast milk. Nicotine could cause numerous unwanted symptoms in the baby (such as restlessness, a rapid heartbeat, vomiting, or diarrhea). Some research has also suggested that children whose mothers smoked while pregnant or who have been exposed t

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Pregnant women who smoke risk the health and lives of their unborn babies. Smoking during pregnancy is linked with a greater chance of miscarriage, premature delivery, stillbirth, infant death, low birth-weight, and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Up to 5% of infant deaths would be prevented if pregnant women did not smoke. When a pregnant woman smokes, she’s smoking for two. The nicotine, carbon monoxide, and other harmful chemicals enter her bloodstream, pass directly into the baby’s body, and keep it from getting vital nutrients and oxygen it needs for growth. Breast-feeding is a good way to feed a new baby, but if the mother smokes it exposes the baby to nicotine and other poisons in the smoke through breast milk. Nicotine could cause many unwanted symptoms in the baby, such as restlessness, a rapid heartbeat, vomiting, or diarrhea. Some research has also suggested that children whose mothers smoked while pregnant or who have been exposed to secondhand smoke, even in small amo

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Pregnant women who smoke endanger the health and lives of their unborn babies. Babies of smoking women average 6 ounces less at birth than babies of nonsmoking women. When a pregnant woman smokes, she really is smoking for two because the nicotine, carbon monoxide, and other dangerous chemicals in smoke enter her bloodstream and pass directly into the baby’s body. Statistics show a direct relation between smoking during pregnancy and spontaneous abortions, stillbirths, death among newborns, and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Research shows that the risk of SIDS triples for babies of mothers who smoke during pregnancy; two-thirds of SIDS deaths among babies of women who smoked during pregnancy can be attributed to smoking. Mounting evidence in recent years has also made it clear that children of mothers who smoke have higher than normal risks of developing asthma, especially if the mother smokes during pregnancy. Exposure to second-hand smoke also makes a child s asthma more sever

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A. Any smoking during pregnancy places the health and the life of the unborn baby in jeopardy. Pregnant women who smoke are smoking for two–the nicotine, carbon monoxide, and all the other harmful chemicals pass through her bloodstream and enter the baby’s body. This places babies born to women who smoke at a greater risk for the following difficulties: miscarriage, premature delivery, stillbirth, infant death, low birth-weight, and SIDS. It has also been suggested by some research that children of women who smoked during pregnancy or who are exposed to secondhand smoke may be slower learners in school, be shorter and smaller than other children, and are more likely to smoke as an adult.

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