How is a molar pregnancy diagnosed?

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How is a molar pregnancy diagnosed?

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Providers use an ultrasound to diagnose a molar pregnancy. The provider also measures the levels of hCG, which often are higher than normal with a molar pregnancy. back to top How is a molar pregnancy treated? A molar pregnancy is a frightening experience. Not only does the woman lose a pregnancy, she learns that she has a slight risk of developing cancer. To protect the woman, all molar tissue must be removed from the uterus. This usually is done with a D&C. Occasionally, when the mole is extensive and the woman has decided against future pregnancies, a woman may have a hysterectomy. After mole removal, the provider again measures the level of hCG. If it has dropped to zero, the woman generally needs no additional treatment. However, the provider continues to monitor hCG levels for 6 months to 1 year to be sure there is no remaining molar tissue (4). A woman who has had a molar pregnancy should not become pregnant again for 6 months to 1 year, because a pregnancy would make it difficu

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If you have symptoms that suggest a molar pregnancy, your health professional will do some simple tests. A pelvic exam, a blood test of your pregnancy hormone (human chorionic gonadotropin, or hCG) levels, and a pelvic ultrasound can confirm whether you have a molar pregnancy. Molar pregnancy may also be found during a routine ultrasound in early pregnancy. Partial molar pregnancies are often found at the time of treatment for an incomplete miscarriage.

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An ultrasound examination can diagnose a molar pregnancy. The provider also measures the levels of hCG, which often are higher than normal with a complete mole, and lower than normal with a partial mole. How is a molar pregnancy treated? A molar pregnancy is a frightening experience. Not only does the woman lose a pregnancy, she learns that she has a slight risk of developing cancer. To protect the woman, all molar tissue must be removed from the uterus. This usually is done using a D&C under general anesthesia. Occasionally, when the mole is extensive and the woman has decided against future pregnancies, a hysterectomy may be performed. After mole removal, the provider again measures the level of hCG. If it has dropped to zero, the woman generally needs no additional treatment. However, the provider will continue to monitor hCG levels for six months to one year to be sure there is no remaining molar tissue (7). A woman who has had a molar pregnancy should not become pregnant for six m

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