How is a molar pregnancy treated?

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How is a molar pregnancy treated?

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The initial treatment for a molar pregnancy is to remove the tissue from the uterus with an evacuation (‘D and C’). In this procedure the cervix is dilated in order to allow a suction curette to enter and the remove the abnormal tissue. In some cases of partial molar pregnancy, the molar tissue may be removed by a medical evacuation with tablet treatment used to empty the uterus.

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A molar pregnancy is a frightening experience. Not only does the woman lose a pregnancy, she learns that she has a slight risk of developing cancer. To protect the woman, all molar tissue must be removed from the uterus. This usually is done using a D&C under general anesthesia. Occasionally, when the mole is extensive and the woman has decided against future pregnancies, a hysterectomy may be performed. After mole removal, the provider again measures the level of hCG. If it has dropped to zero, the woman generally needs no additional treatment. However, the provider will continue to monitor hCG levels for six months to one year to be sure there is no remaining molar tissue (7). A woman who has had a molar pregnancy should not become pregnant for six months to one year, because a pregnancy would make it difficult to monitor hCG levels (7). How often do moles become cancerous? After the uterus is emptied, about 20 percent of complete moles and less than 5 percent of partial moles persis

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If you are diagnosed with a molar pregnancy, you will need immediate treatment to remove all molar growth from your uterus. After your uterus is cleared of molar tissue, you will have periodic hCG blood tests to screen for signs of persistent cell growth (trophoblastic disease) in your uterus. These tests are done periodically for 6 to 12 months. Some women with a molar pregnancy also have a large ovarian cyst (not cancerous). In some cases, trophoblastic disease can develop into trophoblastic cancer. But most cases are identified early, located in the uterus only, and are highly curable with chemotherapy. In the rare case when cancer has had time to spread to another part of the body, more aggressive chemotherapy is necessary, sometimes combined with radiation treatment. Most women who have been treated for trophoblastic disease are still able to become pregnant.1 After having a molar pregnancy, it is common to feel grief over losing a pregnancy and to be fearful about cancer risk. Co

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Most molar pregnancies will spontaneously end and the expelled tissue will appear grape-like. Molar pregnancies are removed by suction curettage, dilation and evacuation (D & C), or sometimes through medication. General anesthetic is normally used during these procedures. Approximately 90% of women who have a mole removed require no further treatment. Follow-up procedures that monitor the hCG levels can occur monthly for six months or as your physician prescribes. Follow-up is done to ensure that the mole has been removed completely. Traces of the mole can begin to grow again and may possess a cancerous-type threat to other parts of the body. Pregnancy should be avoided for one year after a molar pregnancy. Any birth control method is acceptable with the exception of an intrauterine device.

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If you are diagnosed with a molar pregnancy, you will need immediate treatment to remove all molar growth from your uterus. After your uterus is cleared of molar tissue, you will have periodic hCG blood tests to screen for signs of persistent cell growth (trophoblastic disease) in your uterus. These tests are done periodically for 6 to 12 months. In some cases, trophoblastic disease can develop into trophoblastic cancer. However, most cases are identified early, located in the uterus only, and are highly curable with chemotherapy. In the rare case when cancer has had time to spread to another part of the body, more aggressive chemotherapy is necessary, sometimes combined with radiation treatment. Most women who have been treated for trophoblastic disease are still able to become pregnant After having a molar pregnancy, it is common to feel grief over losing a pregnancy and be fearful about cancer risk. Consider contacting a support group or talking to friends, a counselor, or religious

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