How to stop dog from running away?

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How to stop dog from running away?

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An exact answer to this question requires more information.  If your dog is an unneutered male, having him altered will help with his wandering.  Male dogs that aren’t fixed are more likely to run off in search of females in heat.  Behavior training is another solution.  If you don’t have a fenced in yard, look into getting one.  An electric fence will keep him/her on your property. Training a dog to "come" is important.  Some dogs are so excited by all the sights and smells of the outdoors that it’s difficult for them to focus on you and come when called.  Training a dog to come when called will keep him/her from traveling too far from you.  If all else fails, keep your dog on a leash at all times when outside.  If you’re going out for exercise in an open area, an extra long lead will give him/her room to run and explore while making sure you still have control.  Good luck!

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Keri Hays

There isn’t a lot of information given about this.  If the dog is neutered maybe he has a girlfriend.  Maybe you need to put a fence up.  If its a puppy than it’s him being curious.

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Lacy Sheridan

Many dogs can get overexcited by things they see in the distance and run off to inspect them, especially social dogs that see another dog or a person and want to say hi. The only solution to this is to train your dog to wait at doors that lead outside, come when called, and either train them very well to be off-leash or keep them on leash at all times when outside, unless in an enclosed area.

Waiting at doors can be easily trained throughout the day by making your dog sit and wait patiently whenever you let them through any door that leads outside or inside through any door from outside. It can be done before and after walks and before and after going outside to go potty or play. Whenever you come to the door, make your dog keep calm and sit before opening the door. If they try to run through it, block them with your body but not your hands–dogs consider hands to be a part of play, so this will turn it into a game instead of training–and force them away from the door. Continue this until they stop trying to run through and wait patiently, and then let them through. As they get better and better extend the time they have to wait to increase their patience. Recalls (coming when called) can be trained by a variety of games and activities. My personal favorite is to get a large group of people (3 or more is best) in a large area, like your backyard. Give each person a handful of treats and have everybody stand in a wide circle with the dog in the middle, and have people call the dog’s name at random and give a treat for coming to them. Avoid any kind of pattern so the dog has to respond to the call and not rely on predicting who will call them next. With these two methods your dog will be much less likely to bolt through doors before you can stop them, and if they do get out will come back to you when called.

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At 7 months she’s still a puppy with a normal curiousity about life. As an American Bulldog, she’s going to be very social with people, especially children. This behavior was more of a problem with my female than my male ABD and when she slipped out the door at four months old to play with the kids across the street, she was struck by a car. Luckily she only had a few bumps and bruises, but it scared me enough to do something about it. The only solution was training. I purchased a 30′ lead and began putting her on it every time we went outside. We would walk around the yard and every time she went outside of her boundaries I would make a sound that she knew meant no. It took a couple of weeks, but she got the idea that she wasn’t to leave the yard. I also worked on keeping her away from the doors. Any time she approached the door, I would place myself between it and her and say “Back” while walking toward her. It interfered a little with her housebreaking, but she adjusted and now goes

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