How well do 80-minute CD-R blanks work?

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How well do 80-minute CD-R blanks work?

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(2004/03/04) In general, they work just fine. Reports from people who have used 80-minute CD-Rs indicate that compatibility with different CD-ROM drives is very good. However, bear in mind the following statement, which was sent by e-mail from a TDK representative: “The CD-R80 is a special product developed by TDK to meet the application needs of software developers and music studios. To achieve its 80 minute recording time, track pitch and scanning velocity specification tolerances had to be minimized, reducing the margin of error between drive and media. This means limited compatibility between some CD-Recorders and CD-ROM Readers. If you intend to use this recording length, please check with your hardware manufacturer. Use of the CD-R80 is at one’s own risk. No guarantees of performance are made by TDK.” Whether it’s better to use 80-minute discs or “overburning” (described in the next section) is a worthy subject for debate.

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In general, they work just fine. Reports from people who have used 80-minute CD-Rs indicate that compatibility with different CD-ROM drives is very good. However, bear in mind the following statement, which was sent by e-mail from a TDK representative: “The CD-R80 is a special product developed by TDK to meet the application needs of software developers and music studios. To achieve its 80 minute recording time, track pitch and scanning velocity specification tolerances had to be minimized, reducing the margin of error between drive and media. This means limited compatibility between some CD-Recorders and CD-ROM Readers. If you intend to use this recording length, please check with your hardware manufacturer. Use of the CD-R80 is at one’s own risk. No guarantees of performance are made by TDK.” Whether it’s better to use 80-minute discs or “overburning” (described in the next section) is a worthy subject for debate. Both can cause problems on different CD-ROM drives, and not all record

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In general, they work just fine. Reports from people who have used 80-minute CD-Rs indicate that compatibility with different CD-ROM drives is very good. However, bear in mind the following statement, which was sent by e-mail from a TDK representative: “The CD-R80 is a special product developed by TDK to meet the application needs of software developers and music studios. To achieve its 80 minute recording time, track pitch and scanning velocity specification tolerances had to be minimized, reducing the margin of error between drive and media. This means limited compatibility between some CD-Recorders and CD-ROM Readers. If you intend to use this recording length, please check with your hardware manufacturer. Use of the CD-R80 is at one’s own risk. No guarantees of performance are made by TDK.” The TDK discs are now “official”; see http://www.tdk.com/n_80mincd.html. Whether it’s better to use 80-minute discs or “overburning” (described in the next section) is a worthy subject for debat

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(2004/03/04) In general, they work just fine. Reports from people who have used 80-minute CD-Rs indicate that compatibility with different CD-ROM drives is very good. However, bear in mind the following statement, which was sent by e-mail from a TDK representative: “The CD-R80 is a special product developed by TDK to meet the application needs of software developers and music studios. To achieve its 80 minute recording time, track pitch and scanning velocity specification tolerances had to be minimized, reducing the margin of error between drive and media. This means limited compatibility between some CD-Recorders and CD-ROM Readers. If you intend to use this recording length, please check with your hardware manufacturer. Use of the CD-R80 is at one’s own risk. No guarantees of performance are made by TDK.” Whether it’s better to use 80-minute discs or “overburning” (described in the next section) is a worthy subject for debate. Both can cause problems on different CD-ROM drives, and n

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Here’s a few personal notes on my experiments with TDK 80-minute “green” blanks. Such discs are supposedly available directly from TDK (USA sales +1 800 835 8273), and I was able to purchase a small quantity (three discs) from Microboards at http://www.microboards.com/. The discs were part number SCWA-ETC80A-X, priced at US$40.00 per disc in October 1997. Yes, that’s about 20x the cost for an extra 8% storage. The discs were unbranded. The only difference I could see between these and other TDK green discs is that on the hub it says “CD-Recordable 6129B-80”. Easy CD Creator Deluxe v3 showed 359,624 blocks (702.8MB in MODE-1) on the TDK 80-minute blanks, versus 333,010 blocks (650.8MB) available on my Mitsui gold 74-minute blanks. Relatively inexpensive 80-minute blanks are becoming more common. Examples of sites include http://www.cd-brennen.de/cdr/, http://www.transco.co.uk/, http://www.burlington-av.com/, http://www.web-access.net/~clarkent/, and http://www.esware.net/empire/hardware

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