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I have prolapse, but I don't leak urine. Do I still need bladder testing?

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If you are going to have surgery to correct the prolapse, bladder testing (called urodynamics) should be done first. That's because the prolapsed portion of your vagina may be pushing on your urethra and preventing urine leakage. If that is the case, having the prolapse corrected can give you a new problem - urinary incontinence. The only way to tell whether a continence procedure is needed at the time of prolapse surgery is to perform urodynamics while holding the prolapse up in its normal position. Also, many women with prolapse may have other bladder problems such as frequency, urgency, or trouble emptying - all of which should be addressed prior to surgery. more
2bdry.com
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Yes. If you plan to have surgery to correct prolapse, bladder testing called urodynamics testing must be done first. In some patients, the prolapsed portion of the vagina may be pushing on and closing the urethra, preventing urine leakage. In this situation, surgery that corrects the prolapse and lifts pressure off the urethra may create a new problem - urinary incontinence. Urodynamic testing is the only way to determine whether a continence procedure is needed in addition to the surgery to correct prolapse. CLICK HERE for more information about urodynamic testsing. more
utsouthwestern.edu
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Yes, if you are going to have surgery to correct the prolapse, bladder testing (called urodynamics) must be done first. That's because the prolapsed portion of your vagina may be pushing on your urethra and preventing urine leakage. If that is the case, having the prolapse corrected can give you a new problem - urinary incontinence. The only way to tell whether a continence procedure is needed at the time of prolapse surgery is to perform urodynamics while holding the prolapse up in its normal position. more
urogyncenter.com
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Most likely. If you are going to have surgery to correct the prolapse, bladder testing (called urodynamics) usually is done first. That's because the prolapsed portion of your vagina may be pushing on your urethra and preventing urine leakage. If that is the case, having the prolapse corrected can give you a new problem - urinary incontinence. The best way to tell whether a continence procedure is needed at the time of prolapse surgery is to perform urodynamics while holding the prolapse up in its normal position. If my surgery is successful, how long will it last? The goal of continence or pelvic reconstructive surgery is to re-create normal anatomy permanently. However, none of these procedures are successful 100% of the time. According to the medical literature, failures occur in approximately 5 - 15% (think we are underestimating this would make the range 5-25 or 30% in some of our anterior repair type surgery) of women who have prolapse surgery. In these cases, it is usually a ... more
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Yes. If you plan to have surgery to correct prolapse, bladder testing called urodynamics testing must be done first. In some patients, the prolapsed portion of the vagina may be pushing on and closing the urethra, preventing urine leakage. In this situation, surgery that corrects the prolapse and lifts pressure off the urethra may create a new problem - urinary incontinence. Urodynamic testing is the only way to determine whether a continence procedure is needed in addition to the surgery to correct prolapse. CLICK HERE for more information about urodynamic testsing. How will treatment of my pelvic organ prolapse affect my sex life? If patients choose to use a pessary, their sex life shouldn't change, except that the pessary usually needs to be removed prior to intercourse. If patients have reconstructive surgery to correct prolapse, we recommend that they refrain from intercourse for 3 months after their operation to allow proper healing. After waiting three months, adjusting to ... more
utsouthwestern.edu
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Yes, if you are going to have surgery to correct the prolapse, bladder testing (called urodynamics) must be done first. That's because the prolapsed portion of your vagina may be pushing on your urethra and preventing urine leakage. If that is the case, having the prolapse corrected can give you a new problem - urinary incontinence. The only way to tell whether a continence procedure is needed at the time of prolapse surgery is to perform urodynamics while holding the prolapse up in its normal position. What will happen if I just ignore this problem? Will it get worse? Yes. It may not happen quickly, but if left untreated, pelvic organ prolapse almost always gets worse. The one exception to that rule can occur shortly after having a baby. New prolapse (noticed by a patient or doctor in the early postpartum period) will often get better within the first year after the delivery. However, treatment of prolapse should be based on your symptoms. In rare cases, severe prolapse can cause ... more
lonestarurogyn.com

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