Is epilepsy genetic?

0
Posted

Is epilepsy genetic?

0

This is the question, most people are afraid of. Who are really prone to getting epilepsy? Youngsters and adolescents have a great probability of having epilepsy of unknown or genetic origin than adults. Cases of epilepsy in very young children might be a big deal for some people; since it is very obvious that genetics or heredity is responsible for having such disorder. A history of seizures in the family is an evidence for those people who have developed epilepsy. People with a family history imply that they are more prone for having it, than people who have no genetic tendency. There is one but common type of epilepsy in which seizures start simultaneously from both faces of the brain. This is called the primary generalized epilepsy, which is more expected to engage some factors of genetics than partial epilepsy. In partial epilepsy, seizures come about only from limited parts of the brain. One mother would ask: Will my kids acquire epilepsy if I have it? It was recorded as already

0

Some types of epilepsy run in families. If you have generalized epilepsy, your first-degree relatives (parents, siblings, and children) have about a four-fold increased risk for epilepsy. First-degree relatives of people with partial seizures have twice the risk of developing epilepsy as the general population. Although there is some increased risk, it is important to remember that the overall risk of epilepsy in other family members is still low.

0

Written and reviewed by: My Child Without Limits Advisory Committee Research suggests that genetic abnormalities may be some of the most important factors contributing to epilepsy. Some types of epilepsy have been traced to an abnormality in a specific gene. Many other types of epilepsy tend to run in families. Some researchers estimate that more than 500 genes could play a role in epilepsy. However, it has become more and more clear that, for many forms of epilepsy, genetic abnormalities are only partly responsible. This may be because they increase a person’s likelihood of having seizures that are triggered by an environmental factor. While abnormal genes sometimes cause epilepsy, they also may affect it in less noticeable ways. For example, one study showed that many people with epilepsy have an abnormally active version of a gene that increases resistance to drugs. This may help explain why anticonvulsant drugs do not work for some people. Genes may also control other aspects of th

1

In most cases, epilepsy is not inherited. The website I found states that, “sometimes epilepsy happens as part of an inherited medical condition, passed from parent to child. This is rare, but includes the conditions neurofibromatosis and tuberous sclerosis.”-both of these are fairly serious, but rare diseases that are associated with seizures. However, in my family, my mother’s sister, my younger brother and I all suffer from epilepsy-3 different types. So I’ve been wondering the same thing, I’d hate to pass it on to my children. My neurologist has always told me that if I was planning pregnancy, to speak with him ahead of time. Many anti-epileptic drugs can cause deformities and abnormalities during pregnancies. It’s a scary thought, I know, but if you talk to your doctor, there are some AEDs that are safer for pregnant women. If you have any other questions, feel free to contact me. I wish you the best of luck.

0

Factors that may trigger epileptic seizures include: Brain injury. People who have experienced some sort of brain trauma, such as a severe head injury, are at a high risk of developing epilepsy. Trauma to the brain may disturb the functioning of the neurons, which may lead them to misfire and cause seizures. Many people who sustain a head injury experience a seizure within weeks of the injury. However, these are sometimes isolated events and do not always mean that the person will develop epilepsy. Genetic abnormalities. Some forms of epilepsy have been found to run in families and are thought to be caused by genetic abnormalities. There are many genes that have been linked to epilepsy. However, only a small proportion of epilepsy types are believed to develop as a direct result of genetic abnormalities. Instead, studies have shown that people with certain genetic abnormalities are more susceptible to seizures caused by other factors, such as brain trauma. Infections. Certain infection

Related Questions