My new Punch Power Series amplifier is capable of a 24 dB per octave slope on the crossover. Why would I want to use 24 dB per octave instead of 12 dB per octave?

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My new Punch Power Series amplifier is capable of a 24 dB per octave slope on the crossover. Why would I want to use 24 dB per octave instead of 12 dB per octave?

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When we speak of “slope” regarding crossover networks, what we are referring to is the amount of attenuation the crossover has above or below the crossover frequency. If we say we have a crossover of 80 hertz “low pass”, that means that frequencies above 80 hertz are attenuated (reduced in level). However, that doesn’t mean that everything above 80 hertz is completely eliminated. The slope of the crossover determines how quickly the information above 80 hertz is attenuated. The steeper the slope (higher number), the faster the information is attenuated. So, it sounds like we would always want to use a steeper slope right? There are times when it can be an advantage. For instance, if we use a steeper slope on the woofers in a system, we will attenuate the higher frequencies faster. This can give us more “bass up front” in a system. Likewise, using a steeper slope in a high pass application can give speakers higher power handling by removing the low frequencies faster. The Fanatic Compon

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