Those both sound sinfully good. But that raises a different question: Is Slow Food really just a way of promoting culinary hedonism?

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Those both sound sinfully good. But that raises a different question: Is Slow Food really just a way of promoting culinary hedonism?

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• A.(Laughs) I like that! But more seriously, it’s a bit off the mark. Hedonism implies the pursuit of unlimited pleasure as the supreme goal, above all else. We’re not gluttons or drunkards, and we think that it’s very reasonable to seek pleasure as much as possible within the realm of socially responsible food—that is, food that’s good, clean, and fair. That said, there is a more limited sense in which your question resonates, and that is this one: We do advocate taking pleasure in food, and we’re not ashamed of that. Americans tend to have a very well-developed sense of guilt—so much so that almost any pleasure becomes a guilty pleasure. And we don’t do nuance very well, either: if somebody tells us that something is bad for us, we tend to avoid it altogether rather than ask, “Well, is it okay in moderation?” We don’t want to touch anything that has a gram of fat, a single carb, a fiber of red meat, and so on. If someone finds a downside to leafy vegetables, a good percentage of the

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