What are classic causes of extradural, subdural, and subarachnoid haemorrhages?

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What are classic causes of extradural, subdural, and subarachnoid haemorrhages?

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apple guava, You appear to be answering your own question, so I shall concentrate on your last part that references subdural and subarachnoid. In the majority of cases, acute subdural haematomas (ASDH) are related to head trauma and are typically caused by disruption of superficial cerebral or cortical bridging veins. The classic causes are – Head injury – even if it occurred weeks before, may still be the cause. Brain injury. Sturge-Weber Syndrome. Menkes Disease. Concussion. On a CT scan, subdural haematomas are classically crescent-shaped, however, they can have a convex appearance, especially in the early stage of bleeding. A subarachnoid haemorrhage is known as such because the bleeding occurs in the arteries that run underneath a membrane in the brain called the arachnoid, which is just below the surface of the skull. Three quarters of subarachnoid haemorrhages are caused when an aneurysm ruptures. An aneurysm is a bulge in a blood vessel that is caused by a weakness in the blood

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