What are the different types of diabetes?

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What are the different types of diabetes?

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• Type 1 – A disease in which the body does not produce any insulin, most often occurring in children and young adults. People with Type 1 diabetes must take daily insulin injections to stay alive. Type 1 diabetes accounts for 5-10% of diabetes. • Type 2 – A metabolic disorder resulting from the body’s inability to make enough, or properly use, insulin. Type 2 diabetes, which most often appears after age 40, is also rising among children and persons under 40 years. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of the disease, accounting for 90- 95% of diabetes. It is nearing epidemic proportions, due to an increased number of older Americans, and a greater prevalence of obesity and sedentary lifestyles. • Other – Some women develop diabetes during pregnancy. Known as gestational diabetes, this condition occurs in 2-5% of all pregnancies.

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Type 1 Diabetes In this type of diabetes, the pancreas no longer produces insulin thereby causing glucose (sugar) to build up in the blood. People with Type 1 diabetes must take insulin either by injections or through an insulin delivery system such an insulin pump. The treatment also includes a balanced carbohydrate, low-fat, low-sodium meal plan and regular exercise. This type of diabetes is less common, an estimated 500,000 to a million Americans have this type of diabetes. Type 1 is an autoimmune disease which usually occurs in children and young adults. It often appears suddenly and the symptoms, which mimic the flu, can be severe Signs and symptoms of Type 1 diabetes: • Increased thirst; • Frequent urination or bed wetting in children; • Increased hunger; • Extreme weight loss; • Lack of energy, being tired and weak; • Feeling edgy and having mood changes; • Feeling sick to your stomach and / or vomiting; • High levels of sugar in the blood and urine. Although what causes diabete

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The most common types of diabetes are type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes was previously called insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) or juvenile-onset diabetes. Type 1 diabetes may account for 5% to 10% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. About half of all cases of type 1 diabetes appear in childhood or in the early teenage years. Risk factors are less well defined for type 1 diabetes than for type 2 diabetes, but auto-immune, genetic, and environmental factors are involved in the development of this type of diabetes. The major difference between type 1 and type 2 is that for type 1 the pancreas makes little or no insulin. Whereas in type 2’s the pancreas is still producing insulin but not in a high enough quantity. Type 2 diabetes was previously called non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) or adult-onset diabetes. Type 2 diabetes may account for about 90% to 95% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes and most often occurs in adults. Risk factors for type 2 diabetes include

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The most common types of diabetes are Type 1, Type 2, and Gestational diabetes. Type 1 diabetes results when the body does not make any insulin because the bodys immune system destroys the cells in the body that make insulin. It is often diagnosed in childhood, although it can occur at any age. Patients with Type 1 diabetes must use insulin injections to control their diabetes. For more information on Type 1 diabetes, click here. (http://www.diabetes.org/type-1-diabetes.jsp) Type 2 diabetes results when the body does not make enough insulin and/or the insulin is not properly used by the body (insulin resistance). Type 2 diabetes is often diagnosed in adults, though there is an increasing number of teenagers being diagnosed, and is the most common type of diabetes, accounting for about 90-95% of all cases of diabetes. It is often associated with older age, obesity and/or physical inactivity, a family history of diabetes, a history of gestational diabetes, and impaired glucose tolerance.

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The three main types of diabetes are: • Type 1 diabetes is commonly diagnosed in children and young adults, but it’s a lifelong condition. If you have this type of diabetes, your body does not make insulin, so you must take insulin every day. Treatment for type 1 diabetes includes taking insulin shots or using an insulin pump, making healthy food choices, getting regular physical activity, taking aspirin daily (for many people), and controlling blood pressure and cholesterol levels. • Type 2 diabetes is the most common type of diabetes — about 9 out of 10 people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. You can get type 2 diabetes at any age, even during childhood. In type 2 diabetes, your body makes insulin, but the insulin can’t do its job, so glucose is not getting into the cells. Treatment includes taking medicine, making healthy food choices, getting regular physical activity, taking aspirin daily (for many people), and controlling blood pressure and cholesterol levels. If you have type

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