What are the different types of diabetes?

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What are the different types of diabetes?

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Type 1 (insulin-dependent or juvenile) Type 1 diabetes (juvenile diabetes) can occur at any age, but most commonly is diagnosed from infancy to the late 30s. In this type of diabetes, a person’s pancreas produces little or no insulin. Although the causes are not entirely known, scientists believe the body’s own defense system (the immune system) attacks and destroys the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. People with type 1 diabetes must inject insulin several times every day.

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Type 1 (juvenile) Type 1 diabetes can occur at any age, but is most commonly diagnosed from infancy to the late 30s. With this type of diabetes, a persons pancreas produces no insulin. It occurs when the bodys own defence system (the immune system) attacks and destroys the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, although what causes the immune system to do this is not entirely known. People with type 1 diabetes must inject insulin several times every day. Type 2 (adult-onset) Type 2 diabetes typically develops after age 40, but can appear earlier. With this type of diabetes, the pancreas still produces insulin but not enough, or the body is not able to use it effectively. Treatment includes diet control, exercise, self-monitoring of blood glucose and, in some cases, oral drugs or insulin. Gestational Diabetes Between two and five percent of pregnant women develop high blood sugar during pregnancy. Although this type of diabetes usually disappears after the birth of the baby, women who

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Diabetes is a metabolic disorder which is characterized by difficulties with processing glucose, causing an elevation in blood sugar and an assortment of other health problems. There are three main types of diabetes: gestational diabetes, type I diabetes, and type II diabetes. Treatment plans for the various types are very different, although they share many commonalities in terms of symptoms and potential risks. Type I diabetes is also sometimes called “insulin-dependent diabetes.” It is an auto-immune disorder in which the immune system attacks the cells which normally generate insulin, a compound necessary for digesting glucose. Patients with type I diabetes must take supplemental insulin and monitor their blood sugar levels carefully to treat the disease; some lifestyle recommendations may be made as well to make patients more healthy in general. Around 10-15% of diabetics have this type of diabetes. Type II diabetes is characterized by a development of insulin resistance, meaning

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For purposes of this write-up, only the three main types shall be discussed. They are the following: a) Diabetes Mellitus Type 1 – Also called juvenile onset diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), Type 1 diabetes is characterized by a decreased or outright absence of production of insulin. This is due to a disorder in the autoimmune response of the person, causing his own antibodies to attack the insulin producing cells in the pancreas. Why this happens is a question that has continued to perplex scientists. The theories as to its cause are complex and unclear, involving genetics, viruses, diet and environmental factors such as chemicals. People diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes require regular shots of insulin (with injections, pumps, or other methods) for without it, the result could be fatal. 10% of diabetics have this type of diabetes. b) Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 – Also known as adult onset diabetes, obesity-related diabetes, or non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus

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There are two major types of diabetes, called type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes was also called insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), or juvenile onset diabetes mellitus. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas undergoes an autoimmune attack by the body itself, and is rendered incapable of making insulin. Abnormal antibodies have been found in the majority of patients with type 1 diabetes. Antibodies are proteins in the blood that are part of the body’s immune system. The patient with type 1 diabetes must rely on insulin medication for survival. In autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes, the immune system mistakenly manufactures antibodies and inflammatory cells that are directed against and cause damage to patients’ own body tissues. In persons with type 1 diabetes, the beta cells of the pancreas, which are responsible for insulin production, are attacked by the misdirected immune system. It is believed that the tendency to develop abnormal antibodies in type 1 diabetes is, in p

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