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What Happens at the Dispositional Hearing?

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At the dispositional hearing, the judge decides whether the respondent is a "juvenile delinquent" in need of supervision, treatment or confinement (placement). During the hearing, the judge hears testimony from the probation officer about the respondent's previous behavior in school and at home, and any previous court cases involving the respondent. The respondent's parents or guardians and other persons with information helpful to the court may testify. The probation officer may recommend that the respondent be permitted to live at home without court supervision, but with certain conditions set by the court (a "conditional discharge"); or that he or she be supervised by the Probation Department while living at home (an "order of probation"); or that the court place the respondent in a facility away from home, such as a group home or secure facility. The respondent may also be ordered to pay for damage to the complainant's property and/or unreimbursed medical expenses incurred by the ... more
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At the dispositional hearing, the court hears testimony and reviews reports recommending what should be done for the child. Possible dispositions include: releasing the child to the parents or guardian, on the condition that they not commit further neglectful or abusive acts; or releasing the child to the parents or guardian, with supervision and services provided by child-protective agencies; or placing the child in foster care for a period of time, while services are provided to the parents to allow for a possible return of the child at a future date; or final order of protection (may be until child’s 18th birthday); or suspended judgement ( 12 months). A child may be placed in foster care for a period of up to one year. The court has continuing jurisdiction, the child remains legally placed until each permanency hearing is complete and permanency is achieved. All cases of children placed out of their homes must remain on the family court’s calendar until permanency has been ... more
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The dispositional hearing may be held immediately following the adjudication hearing, but shall be held within 30 days following adjudication, unless delayed for good cause. At the dispositional hearing the court will receive testimony and other relevant information with regard to the safety and well being of the child. The court may enter orders regarding case planning which sets forth the responsibilities and timelines necessary to achieve permanency for the child; and the custody of the child. Read Kansas law 38-2253. At the disposition hearing the presiding judge will make one of several dispositional orders authorized by the child in need of care statute. Prior to making such order the court is to consider (1) the child's physical, mental, and emotional condition; (2) the child's need for assistance; (3) the manner in which the parent participated in the abuse, neglect or abandonment of the child; (4) any relevant information from the intake and assessment process; and (5) and ... more
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