What is a GP?

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What is a GP?

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A GP (General Practitioner) is a doctor who looks after the health of local people and deals with a wide range of health issues such as: • General health advice • Contraception and maternity services • Vaccinations If the GP cannot help they may refer you to a hospital for tests or treatment. But remember that if you’re not feeling well, seeing your local GP is not the only way to get help: • A well-stocked medicine cabinet will help you to treat many everyday illnesses at home. For example, a small supply of paracetamol or ibuprofen and other remedies will help you treat ailments such as coughs, colds and sore throats. • Your local pharmacist will help you choose medicines, give you advice on minor health problems and will advise you on whether you need to see your GP. • If you are not registered with a GP and need to see a health professional you can visit an NHS walk in centre – no appointment is needed. Visit NHS Choices to search for your nearest walk in centre. • You can also cal

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A General Practitioner (GP) is a physician who provides general primary and preventative care to patients. GPs are also referred to as family practitioners or family physicians, in a reference to the fact that they provide the basic general care needed for all the members of a family. Many people use a GP as their primary physician, ensuring continuity of care and establishing a long running relationship. It is also possible to encounter a GP in a setting like a health clinic or small rural hospital. Like other doctors, General Practitioners must attend medical school, receiving training in a wide range of fields. Depending on the region in which a GP intends to practice, he or she may receive the qualifications necessary to perform minor surgeries or to provide obstetrical care. Because GPs must deal with a range of symptoms and situations in their practices, they may be asked to complete lengthy residences to ensure that they are competent. In some cases, a GP may work in a hospital

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