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What is a Military Protective Order (MPO)?

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Unit commanders may issue Military Protective Orders (MPOs) to an active duty Service member to protect a victim of domestic abuse/ violence or child abuse (the victim could be a Service member or a civilian). To qualify, you must be in a heterosexual relationship with the abuser and be his spouse/ ex-spouse, current or former intimate partner, or have a child in common. A victim, victim advocate, installation law enforcement agency, or FAP clinician may request a commander to issue an MPO.* MPOs may order the abuser (referred to as "the subject") to: • have no contact or communication (including face to face, by telephone, in writing, or through a third party) with you or members of the your family or household; • stay away from the family home (whether it is on or off the installation); • stay away from the children's schools, child development centers, youth programs and your place of employment; • move into government quarters (barracks); • to leave any public place if the victim ... more
womenslaw.org
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Unit commanders may issue Military Protective Orders (MPOs) to an active duty Service member to protect a victim of domestic abuse/ violence or child abuse (the victim could be a Service member or a civilian). To qualify, you must be in a heterosexual relationship with the abuser and be his spouse/ ex-spouse, current or former intimate partner, or have a child in common. A victim, victim advocate, installation law enforcement agency, or FAP clinician may request a commander to issue an MPO.* MPOs may order the abuser (referred to as "the subject") to: • have no contact or communication (including face to face, by telephone, in writing, or through a third party) with you or members of the your family or household; • stay away from the family home (whether it is on or off the installation); • stay away from the children's schools, child development centers, youth programs and your place of employment; • move into government quarters (barracks); • to leave any public place if the victim ... more
womenslaw.org

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