What is Osmosis?

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What is Osmosis?

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How Osmosis Affects GRP Hulls Osmosis is the condition of visible blisters on a boat’s hull, caused by water absorption. The process of osmosis is the same mechanism by which plants and trees draw water up from the soil to their branches and leaves. Main Causes of Osmosis. Long periods afloat without lay-ups. Warm tropical waters. Fresh water is worse than salt water. Resins that are coloured (including white ones) are more affected than clear resins. The Process of Osmosis. The fibreglass mouldings on a yacht hull are not completely waterproof. Individual water molecules are so small that they can find their way into the layers of glass and resin which form the boat’s hull. Problems start to occur when water molecules merge with other chemicals inside the laminate. These are chemicals such as water-soluble materials, emulsion binders for example. The water molecules can then have a chemical reaction with these substances, forming larger molecules of a new chemical, often acidic. Unlik

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Osmosis refers to the passage of water across a thin membrane from a dilute solution to a more concentrated one. In other words, water moves through the semi-permeable barrier trying to even out the difference in concentration between the two sides. 2) What is reverse osmosis (RO)? The other side of the coin is reverse osmosis. A pump is used to cause a difference in pressure. This difference in pressure means that that water is forced through the membrane. Pure water molecules (H2O) are small enough to pass through the membrane whilst larger solute molecules get trapped. When water is processed by reverse osmosis a large fraction of dissolved material is removed. The cleaner the input water the cleaner the output water will be. Conversely, if your input water is clean enough, you may not need an RO unit. 3) How does RO equipment work? There are 3 stages to R.O. filtration: 1. A pre-filter (PR1-25-OE) initially removes larger suspended particles from the raw water 2. Water is forced th

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The diffusion of water from an area of high concentration of water molecules (high water potential) to an area of low concentration of water (low water potential) across a partially permeable membrane.

 

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Osmosis is the net movement of a solvent across a semipermeable membrane from a region of high solvent potential to an area of low solvent potential down a concentration gradient. It is a physical process in which a solvent moves, without input of energy, across a semipermeable membrane (permeable to the solvent, but not the solute) separating two solutions of different concentrations.[1] Osmosis releases energy, and can be made to do work, as when a growing tree-root splits a stone. Computer simulation of the process of osmosis Computer simulation of the process of osmosis Net movement of solvent is from the less-concentrated (hypotonic), to the more-concentrated (hypertonic) solution, which tends to reduce the difference in concentrations. This effect can be countered by increasing the pressure of the hypertonic solution, with respect to the hypotonic. The osmotic pressure is defined to be the pressure required to maintain an equilibrium, with no net movement of solvent. Osmotic pres

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It is the phenomenon of water flow through a semi-permeable membrane that blocks the transport of salts or other solutes through it. Osmosis is a fundamental effect in all biological systems. It is applied to water purification and desalination, waste material treatment, and many other chemical and biochemical laboratory and industrial processes. When two water (or other solvent) volumes are separated by a semi-permeable membrane, water will flow from the volume of low solute concentration, to the volume of high solute concentration. The flow may be stopped, or even reversed by applying external pressure on the volume of higher concentration. In such a case the phenomenon is called reverse osmosis. If there are solute molecules only in one volume of the system, then the pressure on it, that stops the flow, is called the osmotic pressure. The thermal movement of a solute molecule within a solvent is over damped by the solvent molecules that surround it. The solute movement is wholly det

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