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What is the politically correct term for 'disabled'?

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You just said it right there. The most politically correct and widely used term is 'disabled'. Most of the alternatives are considered inappropriate. 'Handicapped' is often used, but only restricted to describing physical disabilities, while 'disabled' can be used to refer to all kinds of disabilities. The 'Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990' is an example. It prohibits discrimination against Americans with disabilities, not those with 'handicaps' or 'retardations'. more
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I suppose it depends what country you are in but I think disabled is fine, after all we have Disability Living Allowance and the Disability Discrimination Act. I'm not really bothered, but if you feel you must defer to the PB brigade, that's your right, I use a wheelchair, I like 'permanently seated' myself, Lol! If you are thinking for signs etc. I'm sure disabled would be fine - you can't be expected to encompass every physical or mental disability for every possible eventuality! Just treat everybody equally but if they need help, offer it, some will accept with good grace and some may not (we all still have the same personality traits - good and bad! more
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Disabled is a politically correct term - it used to be Handicapped. more
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Perhaps using the proper term of that person's condition would be better than saying disabled like for example a person with hearing loss- either call them Deaf or Hearing impaired, not disabled. But as for others, I would not know and try not to say disabled often and it is also based on people's preferences. more
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Disabled, or person/people with disability/ies. Handicapped is offensive- it's a limiting term. Challenged is just sugar coating, as is impaired or any other word that attempts to 'dance around' the subject matter. A blind person is either blind or they have low vision. They are not visually challenged or visually impaired. A D/deaf person is either deaf or hard of hearing. Hearing impaired, you might get away with calling an 80 year old.. but not a younger deaf person. The word 'Deafie' is not offensive to most culturally Deaf people. A Deafblind person usually prefers the spelling Deafblind, not deafblind- the same applies to anyone who identifies as a member of Deaf culture, but people tend to forget this rule for people who are also blind. A physically disabled person is physically disabled. In this context, it is appropriate to use mobility impaired to signify the person's limitations. A wheelchair user is not wheelchair bound or confined to a wheelchair. You can either say that ... more
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Politically correct and most often accepted by people with disabilities themselves? Language is fluid and malleable - it changes. It depends partly upon the disability and partly upon the place. Calling a person disabled - not THE disabled but a disabled person is almost always considered correct. This the primary term used in the UK and amongst academics and activists in the US. In the US people first language is always correct. Person with X. Person with cerebral palsy. Person with a disability. Handicapped is offensive to almost everyone except people over the age of 50 and people living in 3rd world nations. The idea of being challenged emerged about 10 years ago and is condescending. People with disabilities are not challenged - you are challenged to play chess and one of you wins - disabilities you live with - you struggle - you face them head on - and there is no winning - there is only learning to accept and move onward. People who have cognitive disabilities have embraced ... more
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Disabled suits me fine. That seems to be the term I see the most on job applications or other forms where the information is being used for statistics. more
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