What was the nature and purpose of colonial education?

colonial Education Nature purpose
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What was the nature and purpose of colonial education?

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Anny Key

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Verdun

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Mark Towers

Wow, even in the 17th-century people were educating themselves, and 4 centuries later I can’t find a decent way to make myself study.

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seb345 seb345 edited answer

I see some great ideas about colonial education, yet it didn’t happen in 1647. Alexander was the first one to educate the colonies that he had conquered. He sought to create a big educated nation that would remember him as the one who released them from slavery. He even build around 200 cities called Alexandria. I believe that he had great ideas for the times he lived in, especially if to compare this to the ideas that our politics have now. I have recently read an article about Alexander and I was amazed about his personality. If you wanna read this article too then here you go http://noodol-cafe.com/

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Much of colonial education took place in the home through dame schools, in the church, and through apprentice programs, with instruction dominated by religious teachings. In 1647, Massachusetts passed the “Old Deluder Satan Law,” requiring every town to provide for education; although throughout the colonies, whites, males, and wealthier individuals were most likely to be schooled. Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin viewed the new nation’s schools as a continuation of democratic principles and as a break from classist European traditions. By omitting any mention of education as a federal responsibility, the Constitution left schooling to the states, and so each state developed its own educational culture—although textbooks, from the rudimentary hornbook to the McGuffey Reader—created a minimal national curriculum. From colonial times to the present, continuing educational disputes include: the role of religion in schools, local control and state standards, and inequities in educati

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