Whats in a sector?

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Whats in a sector?

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98 frames of 24 bytes are combined to form a 2352-byte sector and 98 bytes of subcode data. The sector is assembled from F1 Frames, which are byte-swapped, shuffled, and run through a descrambler. The purpose of the scrambler is to reduce the likelihood that regular bit patterns will induce a large digital sum value. It’s worth pointing out that the 2352-byte sector is the smallest unit most CD-ROM drives will allow software to manipulate. It’s only after all of the above that low-level CD-ROM operations, like “RAW DAO-96” reads and writes, begin. This is why making a “bit-for-bit” copy of a disc is tricky. A sector on an audio CD holds 2352 bytes of data. 16-bit stereo samples require 4 bytes per sample, so there’s 2352/4 = 588 samples per sector. At 75 sectors per second, that’s 44100 samples per second (44.1KHz). A sector on a CD-ROM holds 2048 bytes of user data, leaving 304 bytes for other purposes.

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(2002/12/11) 98 frames of 24 bytes are combined to form a 2352-byte sector and 98 bytes of subcode data. The sector is assembled from F1 Frames, which are byte-swapped, shuffled, and run through a descrambler. The purpose of the scrambler is to reduce the likelihood that regular bit patterns will induce a large digital sum value. It should be pointed out that the 2352-byte sector is the smallest unit most CD-ROM drives will allow software to manipulate. It’s only after all of the above that low-level CD-ROM operations, like “RAW DAO-96” reads and writes, begin. This is why making a “bit-for-bit” copy of a disc is tricky. A sector on an audio CD holds 2352 bytes of data. 16-bit stereo samples require 4 bytes per sample, so there’s 2352/4 = 588 samples per sector. At 75 sectors per second, that’s 44100 samples per second (44.1KHz). At this point, the processing for an audio CD is essentially complete. CD players feed the samples through a DAC (or S/PDIF connector) and eventually out to t

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98 frames of 24 bytes are combined to form a 2352-byte sector and 98 bytes of subcode data. The sector is assembled from F1 Frames, which are byte-swapped, shuffled, and run through a descrambler. The purpose of the scrambler is to reduce the likelihood that regular bit patterns will induce a large digital sum value. It should be pointed out that the 2352-byte sector is the smallest unit most CD-ROM drives will allow software to manipulate. It’s only after all of the above that low-level CD-ROM operations, like “RAW DAO-96” reads and writes, begin. This is why making a “bit-for-bit” copy of a disc is tricky. A sector on an audio CD holds 2352 bytes of data. 16-bit stereo samples require 4 bytes per sample, so there’s 2352/4 = 588 samples per sector. At 75 sectors per second, that’s 44100 samples per second (44.1KHz). At this point, the processing for an audio CD is essentially complete. CD players feed the samples through a DAC (or S/PDIF connector) and eventually out to the speakers,

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