Why object oriented software development process difference from conventional software development?

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Posted Kian Jackson edited answer

Why object oriented software development process difference from conventional software development?

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Kian Jackson Kian Jackson edited answer

As much as I know, the traditional approach is used for traditional projects, and the Object-Oriented approach is used for Object-Oriented projects that use another language, but this is not the only difference between the two. For me, the software development field, is very interesting and newsworthy, and I like to read more information on the apm digest community blog, and I highly recommend it because you can find very useful information there not only about software development but also on multiple other topics.

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Glen Moore

I didn’t know that. Thanks for clarifying this.

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Mark Towers

Oh, man, I’m not an expert at this question, I suppose that it would be much profitable to ask some professionals about it. Are you trying to make a software for your business or what? If I’m right, then I should say that it is quite difficult to study everything in a short time and it is, much better to ask a service for help. Check these web application development services if you really need some help. I’m also using it myself, so it is already tested.

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To a certain extent, software development processes can be mixed and matched with various programming paradigms. For instance, you could use a modern agile software development process like XP with an older paradigm such as COBOL procedural programs. I don’t think that anyone is mixing these particular examples, but it is theoretically possible. That being said, there is a certain tendency for projects using object oriented paradigms to also use more modern development processes. This could be partially attributed to timing issues — when object oriented programming languages were becoming more popular, so were more iterative, non-traditional development processes. When people were learning a new language, perhaps they felt like it was more appropriate to learn a new process as well. That isn’t completely true, of course. There were OOP languages going back to the 1980’s (Smalltalk), and it would be some time (15 years?) before agile development processes would start getting attention.