Why would someone smoking a light cigarette take bigger puffs than with a regular cigarette?

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Why would someone smoking a light cigarette take bigger puffs than with a regular cigarette?

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AnnetFowler Kallykally777@gmail.com

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Glen Moore Glen Moore edited answer

Regardless of how big puffs you take you still get the same amount of nicotine. Actually I don’t see the point in smoking light cigarettes when you have to smoke like three of them in a row in order to achieve the needed nicotine saturation. I have been vaping with a device I’d gotten from a vape shop I found online for a while now. Before vaping I was already trying to give up smoking and was smoking heated tobacco from iQOS. To be honest I enjoy vaping more.

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NedBarton

I can tell you from my own experience. No light cigarettes. Any nicotine harms your lungs. If your health is dear to you, then use all the options to give it up. I can recommend using special CBD vape liquids – https://provacan.co.uk/cbd-eliquid/ Vape helps relieve stress as well as when smoking but does not contain harmful components. CBD fluid can be considered a therapeutic option for smoking. This blocks nicotine cravings even for older smokers.

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Cigarette features that reduce the yield of machine-measured tar also reduce the yield of nicotine. Because smokers crave nicotine, they may inhale more deeply; take larger, more rapid, or more frequent puffs; or smoke extra cigarettes each day to get enough nicotine to satisfy their craving. As a result, smokers end up inhaling more tar, nicotine, and other harmful chemicals than the machine-based numbers suggest (1). Tobacco industry documents show that companies were aware that smokers of light cigarettes compensated by taking bigger puffs. Industry documents also show that the companies were aware of the difference between machine-measured yields of tar and nicotine and what the smoker actually inhaled (8). • How can I get help to quit smoking? There are many groups that can help smokers quit: • Go online to Smokefree.gov (http://www.smokefree.gov), a Web site created by NCI’s Tobacco Control Research Branch, and use the Step-by-Step Quit Guide. • Call NCI’s Smoking Quitline at 1–8