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Do using sleep to manage headaches may cause insomnia?”

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Do using sleep to manage headaches may cause insomnia?”

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Using Sleep to Manage Headaches May Cause Insomnia And that may lead to more headaches, new study suggests Posted February 16, 2009 By Tate Gunnerson HealthDay Reporter MONDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) — Headache sufferers often treat their pain by taking naps to sleep it off, but they run the risk of developing insomnia by disrupting their normal sleep patterns and perpetuating the cycle of headaches, a new study shows. “Going to sleep was one of the main things people tried to treat their headaches, and they rated it a very effective treatment,” said study author Jason C. Ong, an assistant professor of behavioral sciences at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. “It could be that people are taking naps or using sleep as a way to try to cope with pain, but that could actually lead to more sleep disturbance at night.” The Rush researchers recruited 65 women from undergraduate psychology courses at a university in the southeastern United States, 32 of whom suffered from tension-ty

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sing Sleep to Manage Headaches May Cause Insomnia And that may lead to more headaches, new study suggests By Tate Gunnerson HealthDay Reporter MONDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) — Headache sufferers often treat their pain by taking naps to sleep it off, but they run the risk of developing insomnia by disrupting their normal sleep patterns and perpetuating the cycle of headaches, a new study shows. “Going to sleep was one of the main things people tried to treat their headaches, and they rated it a very effective treatment,” said study author Jason C. Ong, an assistant professor of behavioral sciences at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. “It could be that people are taking naps or using sleep as a way to try to cope with pain, but that could actually lead to more sleep disturbance at night.” The Rush researchers recruited 65 women from undergraduate psychology courses at a university in the southeastern United States, 32 of whom suffered from tension-type headaches (TTH), while

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