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How can I record RealAudio (.ra), MIDI, WMA, and MP3 on a CD?

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How can I record RealAudio (.ra), MIDI, WMA, and MP3 on a CD?

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(2001/01/22) Most CD players can only handle uncompressed audio in “Red Book” format. Some newer player, such as the AIWA CDC-MP3 and Philips Expanium, can play MP3 files from a CD-ROM. Such discs should be written in ISO-9660 with 8+3 filenames, and ought to use 128Kbps and “plain” stereo for broadest compatibility. The documentation for the I-Jam (http://www.ijamworld.com/) recommends putting no more than 50 MP3 files in a directory. If you don’t have such a player, though, you need to write a standard “Red Book” audio CD. The first step is to convert from whatever format the sound is in to WAV or AIFF. In some cases (e.g. MP3), many of the popular CD recording programs will do the conversion for you. If not, you will need to convert it to 44.1KHz 16-bit stereo PCM format. Once it’s in WAV or (on the Mac) AIFF format, you can record it as you would audio taken from other CDs. Be sure to play it back once after you convert it to make sure that it came out okay. For a tutorial on conve

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Traditionally, CD players could only handle uncompressed audio in “Red Book” format. Newer players gained the ability to play MP3 files from a CD-ROM. Such discs should be written in ISO-9660 with 8+3 filenames, and ought to use 128Kbps and “plain” stereo for broadest compatibility. If you don’t have an MP3-CD compatible player, you need to write a standard “Red Book” audio CD. Most CD recording applications will now allow you to record directly from MP3 files. This wasn’t always the case. If your software isn’t capable, or you’re discovering that clicking noises are being added during the recording process, you should convert the file to WAV or AIFF first. Use 44.1KHz 16-bit stereo PCM format. Once it’s in WAV or (on the Mac) AIFF format, you can play it to verify that the audio sounds right, and then record from those files. For a (now somewhat dated) tutorial on converting CD-DA to MP3 and vice-versa, see http://web.archive.org/web/20040217201113/http://www.cdpage.com/Compact_Disc_C

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Most CD players can only handle uncompressed audio in “Red Book” format. Some newer player, such as the AIWA CDC-MP3 and Philips Expanium, can play MP3 files from a CD-ROM. Such discs should be written in ISO-9660 with 8+3 filenames, and ought to use 128Kbps and “plain” stereo for broadest compatibility. The documentation for the I-Jam (http://www.ijamworld.com/) recommends putting no more than 50 MP3 files in a directory. If you don’t have such a player, though, you need to write a standard “Red Book” audio CD. The first step is to convert from whatever format the sound is in to WAV or AIFF. In some cases (e.g. MP3), many of the popular CD recording programs will do the conversion for you. If not, you will need to convert it to 44.1KHz 16-bit stereo PCM format. Once it’s in WAV or (on the Mac) AIFF format, you can record it as you would audio taken from other CDs. Be sure to play it back once after you convert it to make sure that it came out okay. For a tutorial on converting CD-DA t

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(2007/08/08) Traditionally, CD players could only handle uncompressed audio in “Red Book” format. Newer players gained the ability to play MP3 files from a CD-ROM. Such discs should be written in ISO-9660 with 8+3 filenames, and ought to use 128Kbps and “plain” stereo for broadest compatibility. If you don’t have an MP3-CD compatible player, you need to write a standard “Red Book” audio CD. Most CD recording applications will now allow you to record directly from MP3 files. This wasn’t always the case. If your software isn’t capable, or you’re discovering that clicking noises are being added during the recording process, you should convert the file to WAV or AIFF first. Use 44.1KHz 16-bit stereo PCM format. Once it’s in WAV or (on the Mac) AIFF format, you can play it to verify that the audio sounds right, and then record from those files. For a (now somewhat dated) tutorial on converting CD-DA to MP3 and vice-versa, see http://web.archive.org/web/20040217201113/http://www.cdpage.com/C

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