Important Notice: Our web hosting provider recently started charging us for additional visits, which was unexpected. In response, we're seeking donations. Depending on the situation, we may explore different monetization options for our Community and Expert Contributors. It's crucial to provide more returns for their expertise and offer more Expert Validated Answers or AI Validated Answers. Learn more about our hosting issue here.

If a family member has ovarian cancer, can genetic screening determine if other family members will get the disease?

0
10 Posted

If a family member has ovarian cancer, can genetic screening determine if other family members will get the disease?

0

Approximately one out of every ten ovarian cancer cases is hereditary.Most hereditary ovarian cancer can be attributed to two genes, BRCA 1 and BRCA2. Women who inherit a mutation in these genes are at greater risk of developing epithelial ovarian cancer.A thorough evaluation of family history (i.e., a history of breast, colon, or ovarian cancer) can identify women most likely to have a hereditary cancer risk, and genetic testing can determine if these mutations exist. Although having these mutations increases risk, it does not mean a woman will definitely get the disease. Furthermore, while genetic testing can indicate where there is increased risk and help determine appropriate monitoring, women should consider the psychological and possible insurance ramifications before proceeding with testing. Experts suggest that all genetic testing be done in conjunction with genetic counseling. Source: Cancer Control, July, 1999; Genet Test, 2000.

0

Approximately one out of every ten ovarian cancer cases is hereditary. Most hereditary ovarian cancer can be attributed to two genes, BRCA 1 and BRCA2. Women who inherit a mutation in these genes are at greater risk of developing epithelial ovarian cancer. A thorough evaluation of family history (i.e., a history of breast, colon, or ovarian cancer) can identify women most likely to have a hereditary cancer risk, and genetic testing can determine if these mutations exist. Although having these mutations increases risk, it does not mean a woman will definitely get the disease . Furthermore, while genetic testing can indicate where there is increased risk and help determine appropriate monitoring, women should consider the psychological and possible insurance ramifications before proceeding with testing. Experts suggest that all genetic testing be done in conjunction with genetic counseling.

Related Questions

What is your question?

*Sadly, we had to bring back ads too. Hopefully more targeted.