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Question from Dee, “After I open a package of steak, the steaks that I don cook eventually turn brown. Why? What makes the steak turn brown? Is it safe to eat?

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Question from Dee, “After I open a package of steak, the steaks that I don cook eventually turn brown. Why? What makes the steak turn brown? Is it safe to eat?

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Dee, It has to do with oxygen and a scientific word called “myoglobin”. When steaks are first cut they are a deep red, or purple color, and after a few minutes of exposure to oxygen they turn a nice bright red. This is called “blooming”. Over a period of a few days, the myoglobin protein loses it’s ability to hold the oxygen and the meat will turn brown. The same process will turn the inside of hamburger brown, also. On occasion, the myoglobin protein and exposure to the light will cause steaks to have a “bluish/green” tinge when held to the light at a certain angle. Yes, the steaks are fine to eat. Also, the steaks are NOT aging, but just getting old. “Would you be able to tell me the difference between Pork Steaks and Pork Chops?” Pork Steaks are cut from the Boston Butt, or Pork Shoulder.Sometimes they are even cut from the fresh ham (hind quarter), but not often. Pork Chops are cut from the Loin and they may be presented boneless or bone-in.

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