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The fill-stitch pulls the fabric so that when the outline is stiched it creates a gap where there should be stitching. What are some possible solutions?

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The fill-stitch pulls the fabric so that when the outline is stiched it creates a gap where there should be stitching. What are some possible solutions?

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From Lindee Goodall in Embroidery Digest V1 #118: You’re very observant to notice this push and pull of the stitches on the fabric. It takes most new embroiderers much longer. If you were to look more closely, you would notice that the stitches pull most along their length, particularly where they reverse direction and then actually push out along their width. For example, a satin stitch block “I” will be taller due to pushing and narrower due to pulling. As others have commented, the best way to combat this phenomena is with proper hooping and backing techniques. Most of us were not taught to hoop with the backing in the hoop, yet that method (which is more difficult) yields the best results. Another thing to remember (more a problem with samples and scraps when you just want to see what a design looks like) is to have your design running with the grain of the fabric. Which backing should you use? It depends on how stable your garment is. Backing compensates for lack of fabric stabili

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