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What does “Amarok” mean?

Amarok mean
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What does “Amarok” mean?

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Amarok is a phonetic spelling of Amarach (again with a fada over the second ‘a’ to extend the ‘aww’ sound) meaning “tomorrow” in Irish/Gaelic according to Sean Moraghan’s book. I have also seen it defined as “morning” or “genius” but these just don’t seem to fit Irish Gaelic words. Mike himself simply says it’s just a nonsense word but it could mean “I am a rock” referring to his staying power. I think this is a load of rubbish – Mike just didn’t want to answer the question, IMHO. In an interview Mike once said that he heard the word in a television program from the north about wolves, and liked both the sound and the meaning of it. Amaroq also means wolf in Inuktitut (the language of the Inuit people). It’s been spelled amarok, amorak, amrak, to name a few, and amaroq (today’s spelling). That’s because Inuktitut was transcribed phonetically 100 years ago. Regional differences in pronunciation account for the differences in spelling. In Nordic mythology, Amarok is a giant wolf. He stan

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Amarok is a phonetic spelling of Amarach (again with a fada over the second ‘a’ to extend the ‘aww’ sound) meaning “tomorrow” in Irish/Gaelic according to Sean Moraghan’s book. I have also seen it defined as “morning” or “genius” but these just don’t seem to fit Irish Gaelic words (although “morrow” is an old English word for “morning”). Mike himself simply says it’s just a nonsense word but it could mean “I am a rock” referring to his staying power. I think this is a load of rubbish – Mike probably just didn’t want to answer the question. In another interview Mike once said that he heard the word in a television program from the north about wolves, and liked both the sound and the meaning of it. Amaroq also means wolf in Inuktitut (the language of the Inuit people). It’s been spelled amarok, amorak, amrak, to name a few, and amaroq (today’s spelling). That’s because Inuktitut was transcribed phonetically 100 years ago. Regional differences in pronunciation account for the differences

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Amarok is a phonetic spelling of Amarach (again with a fada over the second ‘a’ to extend the ‘aww’ sound) meaning “tomorrow” in Irish/Gaelic according to Sean Moraghan’s book. I have also seen it defined as “morning” or “genius” but these just don’t seem to fit Irish Gaelic words (although “morrow” is an old English word for “morning”). Mike himself simply says it’s just a nonsense word but it could mean “I am a rock” referring to his staying power. I think this is a load of rubbish – Mike probably just didn’t want to answer the question. In another interview Mike said that he heard the word in a television programme from the North about wolves, and liked both the sound and the meaning of it. Amaroq also means wolf in Inuktitut (the language of the Inuit people). It’s been spelled amarok, amorak, amrak, to name a few, and amaroq (today’s spelling). That’s because Inuktitut was transcribed phonetically 100 years ago. Regional differences in pronunciation account for the differences in

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