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What is a DLP LCD and Why is it Cheaper than a Standard LCD HDTV?

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What is a DLP LCD and Why is it Cheaper than a Standard LCD HDTV?

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A DLP LCD television is a type of rear-projection TV that uses Digital Light Processing (DLP) along with Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) technologies. A DLP LCD is an average of 14-inches wide at the bottom rear. It is a less expensive television than a flat-panel LCD HDTV, which is a few inches thick and can be mounted on wall. An LCD HDTV does not use rear-projection technology. There are different types of rear-projection TVs, of which DLP is one. DLP uses a Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) on a semiconductor chip to create an array of grayscale light. Each tiny mirror on the chip represents a single pixel on the display screen. A spinning color wheel sits between the micromirror chip and projection lamp, producing colored hues. This sometimes creates undesirable ‘rainbow’ artifacts, and has been replaced in many cases by newer designs. These include three DMDs and a prism to split light; three LED lights in the primary colors eliminating the color wheel; or advanced color wheel de

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A DLP LCD television is a type of rear-projection TV that uses Digital Light Processing (DLP) along with Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) technologies. A DLP LCD is an average of 14-inches wide at the bottom rear. It is a less expensive television than a flat-panel LCD HDTV, which is a few inches thick and can be mounted on wall. An LCD HDTV does not use rear-projection technology. There are different types of rear-projection TVs, of which DLP is one. DLP uses a Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) on a semiconductor chip to create an array of grayscale light. Each tiny mirror on the chip represents a single pixel on the display screen. A spinning color wheel sits between the micromirror chip and projection lamp, producing colored hues. This sometimes creates undesirable ‘rainbow’ artifacts, and has been replaced in many cases by newer designs. These include three DMDs and a prism to split light; three LED lights in the primary colors eliminating the color wheel; or advanced color wheel design

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