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What is a net peptide content?

content NET peptide
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What is a net peptide content?

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Most peptide (except those devoid of basic amino acids like Arg, Lys, His or with blocked N-term) exist in form of their salts. Synthetic peptides are most likely purified by HPLC, with trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) as modifier. Therefore, these peptides exist as TFA salts, with each basic amino acid residue (Arg, Lys, His) and N-terminus being protonated, and with trifluoroacetate (CF3COO -) counterions. The net peptide content describes (as a percent or a decimal fraction) how much of the received solid peptide represents pure peptide sequence without conterions. It can be calculated by dividing a molecular weight of peptide (supplied in QC documentation) by a sum of this molecular weight and a number of trifluoroacetate counterions (molecular weight of TFA = 114) attached to it. Thus, for example, a synthetic peptide of molecular weight equal 1445 and containing free N-terminal amino group as well as one Arginine and one Lysine would have theoretical net peptide content equal 1445/(144

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