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What is DCC? What is its status today?

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What is DCC? What is its status today?

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DCC is Philips’ attempt to modernize the regular cassette. DCC decks can play analog cassettes, and can record new Digital Compact Cassettes. They use stationary heads (DATs use rotary heads as do VCR’s), and although they are digital, they use lossy compression to fit all the data on the cassette. Although DCC sound quality is far better than the 1960 standard cassette, the DCC does not have the sound quality present in DAT or CD. DCC may be a good choice for consumers who want to assemble mix tapes for cars or walkmans, but is not suitable for any professional applications. As of December 1992, DCC is very new, DCC equipment is very expensive, and the ultimate future of DCC is not assured.

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> DCC is Philips’ attempt to modernize the regular cassette. DCC > decks can play analog cassettes, and can record new Digital > Compact Cassettes. They use stationary heads (DATs use rotary > heads as do VCR’s), and although they are digital, they use > lossy compression to fit all the data on the cassette. Although > DCC sound quality is far better than the 1960 standard cassette, > the DCC does not have the sound quality present in DAT or CD. > DCC may be a good choice for consumers who want to assemble mix > tapes for cars or walkmans, but is not suitable for any > professional applications. > > As of October 1996, DCC is quite affordable in price. Some > DCC home recorders are under $200. However, blank DCC tapes > are still hard to find and fairly expensive ($10 each for 90 > minute lengths). Also, DCC manufacturers are dropping DCC > from their lines, indicating that it is either on the way > out or never made it in.

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DCC is Philips’ attempt to modernize the regular cassette. DCC decks can play analog cassettes, and can record new Digital Compact Cassettes. They use stationary heads (DATs use rotary heads as do VCR’s), and although they are digital, they use lossy compression to fit all the data on the cassette. Although DCC sound quality is far better than the 1960 standard cassette, the DCC does not have the sound quality present in DAT or CD. DCC may be a good choice for consumers who want to assemble mix tapes for cars or walkmans, but is not suitable for any professional applications. As of October 1996, DCC is quite affordable in price. Some DCC home recorers are under $200. However, blank DCC tapes are still hard to find and fairly expensive ($10 each for 90 minute lengths). Also, DCC manufacturers are dropping DCC from their lines, indicating that it is either on the way out or never made it in.

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DCC is Philips’ attempt to modernize the regular cassette. DCC decks can play analog cassettes, and can record new Digital Compact Cassettes. They use stationary heads (DATs use rotary heads as do VCR’s), and although they are digital, they use lossy compression to fit all the data on the cassette. Although DCC sound quality is far better than the 1960 standard cassette, the DCC does not have the sound quality present in DAT or CD. DCC may be a good choice for consumers who want to assemble mix tapes for cars or walkmans, but is not suitable for any professional applications. As of October 1996, DCC is quite affordable in price. Some DCC home recorders are under $200. However, blank DCC tapes are still hard to find and fairly expensive ($10 each for 90 minute lengths). Also, DCC manufacturers are dropping DCC from their lines, indicating that it is either on the way out or never made it in.

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DCC is Philips’ attempt to modernize the regular cassette. DCC decks can play analog cassettes, and can record new Digital Compact Cassettes. They use stationary heads (DATs use rotary heads as do VCR’s), and although they are digital, they use lossy compression to fit all the data on the cassette. Although DCC sound quality is far better than the 1960 standard cassette, the DCC does not have the sound quality present in DAT or CD. DCC may be a good choice for consumers who want to assemble mix tapes for cars or walkmans, but is not suitable for any professional applications. As of October 1996, DCC is quite affordable in price. Some DCC home recorders are under $200. However, blank DCC tapes are still hard to find and fairly expensive ($10 each for 90 minute lengths). Also, DCC manufacturers are dropping DCC from their lines, indicating that it is either on the way out or never made it in.

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