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What is global warming?

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What is global warming?

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The greenhouse effect is not constant and huge variations were observed during the history of the planet. The greenhouse effect becomes an issue when an “overload” of the atmosphere with these greenhouse gases lead to a progressive increase of the mean temperature observed at the earth surface with subsequent potential and dramatical consequences such as climate and sea levels changes. Other chemicals of industrial origin and common use, among which the fluorocarbons, have an intrinsic “greenhouse potential”and could thus potentially contribute to affect the greenhouse equilibrium.

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Global warming is an increase in the near surface temperature of the Earth. Global warming has occurred in the distant past as the result of natural influences, but the term is most often used to refer to the warming predicted to occur as a result of increased emissions of man-made greenhouse gases. Scientists generally agree that the Earth’s surface has warmed by about 1 degree Fahrenheit in the past 140 years. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) recently concluded that increased concentrations of man-made greenhouse gases are causing an increase in the Earth’s surface temperature.

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Global Warming is the gradual warming of the earth’s atmosphere and surface caused by greenhouse gases. Global Warming leads to changes in the climate that can have catastrophic effects on the earth animal and human population.

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Global warming is the increase in the average temperature of the Earth’s near-surface air and oceans since the mid-twentieth century, and its projected continuation. The average global air temperature near the Earth’s surface increased 0.74 ± 0.18 °C (1.33 ± 0.32 °F) during the hundred years ending in 2005. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) concludes “most of the observed increase in globally averaged temperatures since the mid-twentieth century is very likely due to the observed increase in anthropogenic (man-made) greenhouse gas concentrations” via the greenhouse effect. Natural phenomena such as solar variation combined with volcanoes probably had a small warming effect from pre-industrial times to 1950 and a small cooling effect from 1950 onward.

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Global warming generally refers to the recent heating of the planet, which is also known as climate change. Our earth has both warmed up and cooled down in its geological history. Average global temperatures have increased around 1 deg. Fahrenheit the past century. They are projected to rise at rates five to 10 times as fast this century, which is the most rapid increase in 10,000 years, the end of the last ice age. The scientific consensus is that human activities are to blame. If projections are correct, the 21st century will see a temperature increase roughly equal to or greater than the entire global warming after the ice age. And our warming is not from ice age temperatures, but on top of an already warm atmosphere. The speed of change itself raises concerns that plants, animals and human beings will not be able to adapt rapidly enough to the changes.

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