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What problems might I experience while adjusting to my hearing aids?

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What problems might I experience while adjusting to my hearing aids?

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Become familiar with your hearing aid. Your hearing aid dispenser will teach you to use and care for your hearing aids. Also, be sure to practice putting in and taking out the aids, adjusting volume control, cleaning, identifying right and left aids, and replacing the batteries with the hearing aid dispenser present. • The hearing aids may be uncomfortable. Ask the hearing aid dispenser how long you should wear your hearing aids during the adjustment period. Also, ask how to test them in situations where you have problems hearing, and how to adjust the volume and/or program for sounds that are too loud or too soft. • Your own voice may sound too loud. This is called the occlusion effect and is very common for new hearing aid users. Your hearing aid dispenser may or may not be able to correct this problem; however, most people get used to it over time. • Your hearing aid may “whistle”.

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• Become familiar with your hearing aid. Your audiologist will teach you to use and care for your hearing aids. Also, be sure to practice putting in and taking out the aids, adjusting volume control, cleaning, identifying right and left aids, and replacing the batteries with the audiologist present. • The hearing aids may be uncomfortable. Ask the audiologist how long you should wear your hearing aids during the adjustment period. Also, ask how to test them in situations where you have problems hearing, and how to adjust the volume and/or program for sounds that are too loud or too soft. • Your own voice may sound too loud. This is called the occlusion effect and is very common for new hearing aid users. Your audiologist may or may not be able to correct this problem; however, most people get used to it over time. • Your hearing aid may “whistle.” When this happens, you are experiencing feedback, which is caused by the fit of the hearing aid or by the buildup of earwax or fluid. See yo

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Become familiar with your hearing aid. Your audiologist will teach you to use and care for your hearing aids. Also, be sure to practice putting in and taking out the aids, adjusting volume control, cleaning, identifying right and left aids, and replacing the batteries with the audiologist present. The hearing aids may be uncomfortable. Ask the audiologist how long you should wear your hearing aids during the adjustment period. Also, ask how to test them in situations where you have problems hearing, and how to adjust the volume and/or program for sounds that are too loud or too soft. Your own voice may sound too loud. This is called the occlusion effect and is very common for new hearing aid users. Your audiologist may or may not be able to correct this problem; however, most people get used to it over time. Your hearing aid may “whistle.” When this happens, you are experiencing feedback, which is caused by the fit of the hearing aid or by the buildup of earwax or fluid.

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1. Become familiar with your hearing aid. Your audiologist will teach you to use and care for your hearing aids. Also, be sure to practice putting in and taking out the aids, adjusting volume control, cleaning, identifying right and left aids, and replacing the batteries with the audiologist present. 2. The hearing aids may be uncomfortable. Ask the audiologist how long you should wear your hearing aids during the adjustment period. 3. Your own voice may sound too loud. This is called the occlusion effect and is very common for new hearing aid users. Most people get used to it over time. 4. Your hearing aid may “whistle.” When this happens, you are experiencing feedback, which is caused by the fit of the hearing aid or by the buildup of ear wax or fluid. See your audiologist for adjustments. 5. You may hear background noise.

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• Become familiar with your hearing aid. Your audiologist will teach you to use and care for your hearing aids. Also, be sure to practice putting in and taking out the aids, adjusting volume control, cleaning, identifying right and left aids, and replacing the batteries with the audiologist present. • The hearing aids may be uncomfortable. Ask the audiologist how long you should wear your hearing aids during the adjustment period. Also, ask how to test them in situations where you have problems hearing, and how to adjust the volume and/or program for sounds that are too loud or too soft. • Your own voice may sound too loud. This is called the occlusion effect and is very common for new hearing aid users. Your audiologist may or may not be able to correct this problem; however, most people get used to it over time. • Your hearing aid may “whistle.” When this happens, you are experiencing feedback, which is caused by the fit of the hearing aid or by the buildup of earwax or fluid.

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