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When installing the roof ridge tile, what is the minimum overlap between ridge tiles?

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When installing the roof ridge tile, what is the minimum overlap between ridge tiles?

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Ridge tiles must be lapped sufficiently to cover the nail holding the preceding tile. This nail hole must be sealed with roofing cement or other adhesive that will effectively seal the nail hole and provide a firm bond between the two tiles. We are planning to install colonial slate tile on a dome roof with varying pitch from approx. 12:12 to 2:12. What kind of special precautions should be used to prevent wind driven rain from penetrating the system of the lower slopes? It is difficult to totally prevent the entry of wind driven rain into low slope roofs but there are steps that may be taken to guard against leakage and roof damage. Increasing the head lap of the tiles installed at low roof slopes can be helpful in preventing water intrusion but steps must still be taken to prevent damage beneath the tiles. On slopes below 3:12, a sealed underlayment is required and a counterbatten system is required to keep the battens and tile above the roof deck to prevent damming and minimize fast

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Ridge tiles must be lapped sufficiently to cover the nail holding the preceding tile. This nail hole must be sealed with roofing cement or other adhesive that will effectively seal the nail hole and provide a firm bond between the two tiles. I recently tiled my roof with your country slate product. I was wondering if this roof qualifies for the UL 2218 classification and, thereby, an insurance reduction. Our tiles are not tested to the UL 2218 standard since it is not a proper test for rigid products such as tile. Our tiles are tested to the FM 4473 standard which is what we base our hail warranty on. Unfortunately, TDI has not recognized alternate test standards at this time despite overwhelming evidence that concrete tiles outperform nearly all other roofing materials in actual hail storms. We are actively working to get this situation rectified and anticipate that classifications will be assigned during this year. In the meantime, we would gladly enter your name into our database fo

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