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Where do mosquitoes live and breed?

breed live mosquitoes
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Where do mosquitoes live and breed?

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The mosquito that commonly transmits WNV lays its eggs in stagnant water, both in natural ground pools and in artificial containers. The eggs become larvae that remain in the water until they mature and fly off. Weeds, tall grass and shrubbery provide an outdoor home for adult mosquitoes. They can also enter houses through unscreened windows or doors, or broken screens. Most mosquitoes will breed in discarded tires.

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A. Mosquitoes rest in tall grass, weeds, and brush near inhabited locations such as omes and other buildings. • Mosquitoes breed in stagnant, standing fresh water oftentimes found around the home. • In tin cans, buckets, discarded tires and other artificial containers that hold stagnant water. • In untended pools, birdbaths, clogged rain gutters, and plastic wading pools that hold stagnant water. • In storm drains and catch basins in urban areas. • In septic seepage and other foul water sources above or below ground level. • In agricultural irrigation.

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Mosquitoes lay their eggs in moist areas, such as standing water. The eggs become larvae that remain in the water until the adults mature and fly off. Weeds, tall grass and shrubbery provide an outdoor home for adult mosquitoes. They can also enter houses through unscreened windows and doors, or broken screens. Many mosquitoes will breed in containers that hold water, such as flowerpots or discarded tires.

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