where does amber come from?

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Amber is the fossilized resin of now-extinct trees, primarily ancient conifers but also some flowering tropical trees. An aromatic, soft, sticky substance, resin in extinct trees probably served the same purposes as resin in modern trees: to protect the plant by sealing cuts and by excluding bacteria, fungi, and insects. Eventually, clumps of resin fell from the trees. Under the proper low-oxygen conditions-usually, quiet burial in dense, wet, estuarine, or marine sediments-the resin …

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Amber is a hard yellow substance that is usually considered a semi-precious gem. But amber is not a mineral; it’s the remains of trees that lived millions of years ago! In prehistoric times, sap leaked to the ground from pine trees. Some of this sap, or resin, became buried under the ground or under water, and over millions of y

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The original source of amber is the Baltic Sea region consisting of: Norway, Denmark, Sweden, Germany, Poland, Latvia, Estonia and can be traced back to Prehistoric times and was used by our Stone Age predecessors. Baltic amber has even been found in Egyptian tombs dating back to 3200 B.C. Most Baltic Sea amber (Estonia and Latvia) comes from 25-40 meters beneath the ground. Cretaceous amber can be found in California, and Poland (along the northwest side of Gdansk Bay, Bay of Danzig and Baltic coastline, amber can still be found), and in Siberia as well. Tertiary amber can be found in California, (Simi Valley and Ventura County) , Poland, Sweden, (collected off the beaches in the southwest and in her Baltic islands), Germany, (found along the northern portion of Germany/Baltic coastline and inland along the Elbe river), Denmark, found along the west coast of Jutland from Germany to Skagen, Lithuania, (Lithuania has one of the largest amber museums in the world). Latvia in Liepaja is t

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A lot of amber is washed up on the shores of Baltic

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Amber is the fossilized resin of now-extinct trees, primarily ancient conifers but also some flowering tropical trees. An aromatic, soft, sticky substance, resin in extinct trees probably served the same purposes as resin in modern trees: to protect the plant by sealing cuts and by excluding bacteria, fungi, and insects.

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