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What is a POTs Splitter and how does it work?

pots splitter
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What is a POTs Splitter and how does it work?

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POTS (Plain Old Telephone Service) splitter, also known as a low-pass/high-pass filter, is a device that separates the voice portion of the EMBARQ® High-Speed Internet line from the data portion of the line. Depending upon your distance from EMBARQ’s central office, EMBARQ may require two POTS splitters on your line: one at EMBARQ’s central office and another at the customer’s premise. The customer premise splitter ‘splits’ the analog voice signal from the digital data signal and allows two wires to simultaneously activate phone jacks and data jacks to the modem. The splitter at the central office, also known as the DSLAM (Digital Subscriber Line Access Multiplexer), allows for separate voice and data signals, which go to the PSTN (Public Service Telephone Network) and the EMBARQ ATM Network, respectively. When you place your order for EMBARQ® High-Speed Internet online, our system automatically determines whether a splitter will need to be installed for your order.

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A POTS (Plain Old Telephone Service) splitter, also known as a low-pass/high-pass filter, separates the voice and data portions of the DSL line. The customer premise splitter “splits” the analog voice signal from the DSL digital signal, and allows two wires to simultaneously activate phone jacks while others act as data jacks to the DSL modem. The splitter at the central office, also known as the DSLAM (Digital Subscriber Line Access Multiplexer), allows for separate POTS and DSL signals, which go to the PSTN (Public Service Telephone Network) and the First Link ATM Network respectively. Both splitters must be present and compatible to allow simultaneous voice and data transmission.

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