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Why does the orbit number in the filename of AATSR data files claiming to be over a particular location sometimes differ from the orbit number returned by the ESOV software for the same location?

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Why does the orbit number in the filename of AATSR data files claiming to be over a particular location sometimes differ from the orbit number returned by the ESOV software for the same location?

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The orbit number in the product file name is that in which the first data contributing to the product falls. This is not a problem for NRT data, as NRT products are not expected to begin exactly at ANX. However, in the case of consolidated data (orbits defined from ANX to ANX), if the first data slightly precedes the ascending node, then the orbit number of the file is one lower than you might expect. Taking the following file as an example: ATS_TOA_1PPLRA20040605_001448_000062202027_00259_11836_1706.N1.gz The start of data (00:14:48 on 2004 June 5) is very close to the ascending node at the start of absolute orbit 11837. Therefore, although the product predominantly represents orbit 11837, the start of data falls (just) in the preceding orbit. Q When comparing the AST product with the average of the full resolution (GST) product, differences are observed that correlate with differences between the two calculations in respect of the number of pixels that contributed to the average in a

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